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12:25 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Former Terror Expert: 'Very Confident' Case Will Be Solved

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to start the program today by talking about the bombings that shook Boston yesterday afternoon. Today, civic leaders are trying to find out what happened, but also to help their citizens heal. Here's Boston's mayor, Thomas Menino, at a press conference this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

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The Two-Way
11:57 am
Tue April 16, 2013

China Gives Breakdown Of Its Military, Criticizes U.S.

The Russian-built "Liaoning", China's first aircraft carrier, is a potent symbol of the country's growing military might.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 3:39 pm

China on Tuesday detailed the structure of its military force in a special national defense report that also took a swipe at the United States for what it described as stoking tensions in the Asia-Pacific region.

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The Two-Way
11:24 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Vivid Novel About North Korea Wins Pulitzer Honor

Novelist Adam Johnson spent time in North Korea and says "it was deeply surreal to walk among thousands of people in the streets of Pyongyang and see that the men all have the same exact haircut."
Courtesy of Tamara Beckwith

Adam Johnson's The Orphan Master's Son, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction Monday, captures the privation and absurdity of life in North Korea in one sentence: "For breakfast, she murdered an onion and served it raw."

The novel is a surreal, feverish look at North Korea under Kim Jong Il. The protagonist Jun Do (a play on "John Doe") grows up in an orphanage, and serves under Kim as a professional kidnapper before deciding to rebel against the state.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Oklahoma City Marathon Will Proceed, Organizers Say After Boston Attack

Oklahoma City officials say that a marathon that's part of memorial events honoring the anniversary of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building will take place Friday. Here, Boy Scouts take part in the 2010 event.
Brett Deering Getty Images

News of the deadly bombing attack on the Boston Marathon is echoing in Oklahoma City, where residents will observe the 18th anniversary Friday of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which killed 168 people. The events include a marathon, which remains on the schedule, although officials say they will review their security plans.

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The Two-Way
10:45 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Shattered Family: Blast Killed Boy, Wounded Mom & Sister

This undated photo provided by Bill Richard, shows his son, Martin Richard, in Boston. Martin Richard, 8, was among the at least three people killed in the explosions, Monday, April 15, 2013, at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
Uncredited AP/Bill Richard

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:16 pm

There will be many heartbreaking stories in coming hours and days about the victims of Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Among the first such tragic tales is that of the Richard family from Dorchester, Mass.

As the local Dorchester Reporter writes:

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Favorite Sessions
10:44 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Low: Every Note In Its Right Place

Low's Mimi Parker and Alan Sparhawk perform at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, Minn.
Nate Ryan The Current

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 10:58 am

Low's music is minimalist in every sense of the word. Each note, each rise and fall in dynamic, each snippet of between-song banter is intentional and measured.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
10:39 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Investigating The Boston Marathon Bombings

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

Morning Edition co-hosts Steve Inskeep and David Greene discuss the investigation of Monday's Boston Marathon explosions with Roger Cressey, a former counterterrorism investigator and member of the National Security Council, and NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

Shots - Health News
10:35 am
Tue April 16, 2013

How To Avoid A Colonoscopy Billing Kerfuffle

Before your doctor gets to this, make sure he'll bill the colonoscopy as a screening test rather than a diagnostic one.
Sebastian Schroeder iStockphoto.com

Where preventive health care is concerned, a colonoscopy is one of the pricier screening tests, with a cost that often exceeds $1,000.

But under the health care overhaul, most health insurance plans have to cover the test for colorectal cancer without billing patients a dime, even if a polyp is found and removed.

Yet the way your doctor categorizes the test can make all the difference.

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Tue April 16, 2013

IMF Lowers 2013 Economic Growth Forecasts

The IMF says economic woes in places like Cyprus will tamp down global growth.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:30 pm

The International Monetary Fund has lowered its projections for global economic growth, including in the United States, citing sharp cuts in government spending and the struggling eurozone.

The Washington, D.C.-based international lender's World Economic Outlook shaved its 2013 forecast to 3.3 percent from 3.5 percent. It also trimmed its projection for 2014 to 4 percent from 4.1 percent.

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Tue April 16, 2013

The Cruelest Month: Boston Blasts Join List Of Dark Incidents

Oklahoma City Bombing: The Albert P. Murrah Federal Building shows the devastation caused by a fuel and fertilizer truck bomb on April 19, 1995. The blast killed 168 people and injured more than 500.
Bob Daemmrich AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Howard Berkes is an NPR correspondent based in Salt Lake City.

It may have been the dumbest thing I ever said. On April 19, 1999, I stood before an audience at Idaho State University in Pocatello, talking about the cruelest month. April, I pointed out, and April 19 in particular, have provided celebrated, infamous and sometimes horrific moments in our history.

What was it about the month, I wondered, or the time of year, that made April so meaningful and at times so cruel? Back then, the list was relatively short:

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