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Shots - Health News
3:16 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Haiti Moves A Step Closer Toward Eradicating Elephantiasis

Boys at the L'Ecole Les Freres Clement elementary school in Jacmel, Haiti, line up to take deworming pills that protect against elephantiasis.
Maggie Steber for The Washington Post Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:13 pm

Haiti has finally carried out a nationwide campaign to get rid of the parasitic worms that cause elephantiasis.

Haiti has waged other campaigns against the condition, characterized by severe disfiguration of the legs and arms. But until now, it has never managed to adequately reach residents of the chaotic capital Port-au-Prince.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

In Gay America, Optimism Abounds As Stigma Persists, Pew Says

A new survey of more than 1,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adults finds that more than 90 percent feel more accepted in society than they did 10 years ago. Here, a woman displays her pro-gay T-shirt at the L.A. Pride Parade in West Hollywood last Sunday.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:48 pm

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans say they feel more accepted in society than they did 10 years ago, and they're overwhelmingly optimistic that the trend will continue. But a sweeping new Pew Research Center survey also finds persistent levels of stigmatization and secrecy in the community.

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Remembrances
2:25 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Israeli Writer Yoram Kaniuk, 83, On Pain And Peace

Yoram Kaniuk speaks in 2008 at the AFI Fest premiere of Adam Resurrected, based on a novel he wrote.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:34 pm

Born in Israel in 1930, Yoram Kaniuk wrote novels and articles that explored war, the Holocaust, Israel, and the prospect of peace for Israelis and Palestinians. He was an outspoken proponent of the need for Israelis and Palestinians to understand that both groups of people deserve sovereignty.

"Both sides are right, and both sides are so strong about the rightness," he told Fresh Air's Terry Gross in August 1988. He believed that arguing over "who suffered more" wasn't productive.

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Author Interviews
2:25 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Florida-Grown Fiction: Hiaasen Satirizes The Sunshine State

As with many of his novels, Hiaasen sets his latest — Bad Monkey — in his home state of Florida.
Knopf

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:45 pm

As a columnist for the Miami Herald and a prolific novelist of books such as Strip Tease, Lucky You and Star Island, Carl Hiaasen has a subject: Florida. Hiaasen grew up in the state during the 1950s and has lived and worked there his entire life, watching it morph from a rural backwater with abundant natural beauty and resources to one struggling with the effects of development and tourism.

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Alt.Latino
2:20 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Baila Conmigo: 9 New Latin Songs That Rock

Bosnian Rainbows, left to right: Deantoni Parks, Teri Gender Bender, Nicci Kasper, Omar Rodriguez Lopez.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:50 pm

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The Two-Way
1:54 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Chinese Astronauts Dock With Orbiting Space Lab

Chinese astronauts (from left) Wang Yaping, mission commander Nie Haisheng and Zhang Xiaoguang gesture as they prepare to board the Shenzhou-10 spacecraft in Jiuquan, China, on Tuesday.
AFP/Getty Images

A trio of Chinese astronauts has successfully docked with the Tiangong-1 space laboratory for what's expected to be a total of 15 days in orbit — the longest mission to date for China's burgeoning manned space program.

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Parallels
1:52 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Mass Kidnapping Puts Mexican Legal System On Trial

Images from posters made by relatives show 10 of the 12 young people kidnapped in broad daylight from a bar in Mexico City on May 26. No one has claimed responsibility for the brazen abduction.
Marco Ugarte AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:00 pm

Josephina Garcia Rodriguez and Leticia Ponce Ramos sip coffee and console each other at a restaurant in front of Mexico City's prosecutor's office. They're about to head into a meeting with the lead investigator in the case of their kidnapped sons.

"We're going on three weeks since they were kidnapped," Garcia says. "It's been some difficult days, really hard for us mothers. We just want our sons back home with us."

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The Checkout: Live
1:49 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

The Bridge Trio: Live From 92Y Tribeca

Conun Pappas, Jr. of The Bridge Trio.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:19 pm

The trio of Joe Dyson (drums), Max Moran (bass) and Conun Pappas (piano) met in New Orleans' performing-arts high school, and have all gone on to careers in music. Together, they've worked as Donald Harrison's rhythm section before they could legally drink, and in 2012 released a self-titled debut album as The Bridge Trio. Their new-school inspirations and grounding in New Orleans' musical community result in a precociously mature sound.

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Shots - Health News
1:38 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Judge Reluctantly Approves Government Plan For Morning-After Pill

This brand may have a near-monopoly in emergency contraception.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:11 pm

An obviously unhappy Judge Edward Korman has approved the Obama administration's proposal to make just one formulation of the morning-after birth control pill available over the counter without age restrictions.

But in a testily worded six-page memorandum, the federal district judge made it clear he is not particularly pleased with the outcome. He has been overseeing the case in one way or another for more than eight years.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Federal Judge To Face Rare Review Over Controversial Remarks

This undated photo provided by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals shows Judge Edith Jones.
Anonymous Court of Appeals via AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:09 pm

The story of U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Edith Jones involves a controversial speech to the Federalist Society, calls of racism, last-ditch efforts to stop an execution and now a rare formal disciplinary review by the Judicial Council of the District of Columbia Circuit.

The case has been bubbling for the past couple of weeks. It's complicated, but interesting, so we'll tell you about it in chronological order.

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