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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu September 19, 2013

From Kolbasa To Borscht, 'Soviet Cooking' Tells A Personal History

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 6:52 pm

For years I have wondered, albeit vaguely, about gefilte fish, a dish that appears in various guises in novels about Jewish families, almost always at points of celebration or domestic tension. Here's how to make it: Skin a whole pike, mince the flesh, mix with vegetables and bread. Sew the minced fish back into the skin and poach for three hours. Garnish with horseradish.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu September 19, 2013

'Nightmare Range': Crime And (Not Much) Punishment In The DMZ

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 1:51 pm

At the end of the Korean War — a long, bloody, and under-memorialized conflict that claimed millions of lives — no real treaty was ever signed. Although there was an armistice in 1953, the nations of North and South Korea remain, technically, still at war. The Demilitarized Zone along the 38th parallel is one of the tensest borders on earth, with thousands of men, tanks and artillery pieces pointed at each other over minefields and barbed wire fences, fingers on triggers 24 hours a day.

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It's All Politics
6:33 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Lobster Boy Looms Large In Food Stamp Debate

Jason Greenslate was shown using food stamps to purchase lobster in a Fox News report.
YouTube

Before Fox News turned its cameras on him, Jason Greenslate was an anonymous Southern California beach bum, hanging with his surfer pals, playing in a demonstrably awful band and, in his words, "livin' the ratt life."

He doesn't work and gets $200 a month in food stamp assistance that he sometimes uses to buy lobster.

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Europe
6:13 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Exhibit In Scotland Showcases Miniature Books

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. There's a teensy tiny exhibit at the National Library of Scotland showcasing miniature books. One of the world's smallest is a version of the nursery rhyme "Old King Cole" no bigger than a grain of rice. Back in the 1800s, one Scottish publisher discovered that a poorly selling copy of poems by Robert Burns became a bestseller when he miniaturized it, starting a tradition there of wee little tomes, not so much read as collected. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:13 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Jail In Yonkers, N.Y., Is Put On The Real Estate Market

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The key to the real estate is location, location, location. In this case, the location is a jail. Authorities in Yonkers, New York put a lockup on the market. They're asking two-a-half-million dollars for a building that may need renovation, but does have a Hudson River view. Rent laws can make it hard for the buyers of a building to evict the old tenants, but not in this case. We're told the inmates will be moved out on Sunday.

It's All Politics
6:03 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Conservative Lobbyist Derails Bipartisan 'Science Laureate' Bill

The U.S. Capitol at sunrise.
Jason Reed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 11:24 am

No one who's been paying attention for, say, the past few decades, needs to be reminded of how extremely polarized Washington is.

So it's usually good news when Democrats and Republicans can come together on an issue, as they did recently to support the idea of creating the new honorary position of "Science Laureate of the United States."

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Europe
3:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Ban Kids Under 16 From Beauty Pageants

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The French Senate voted to ban beauty pageants for children under 16. The measure is part of a larger bill on women's rights.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that lawmakers see this move as a way to protect the young from being sexualized.

(SOUNDBITE OF A DOCUMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Analysis
3:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Feds Say NYC Building Is A Front For Iran

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the last few days we've learned that Iran has released political prisoners and that its new president and President Obama have written each other. Also suggesting a thaw in the relationship, both leaders expressed a desire to resolve their countries' dispute over Iran's nuclear program. These seeming overtures come as President Hassan Rouhani prepares to fly to New York to address the U.N.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Analysis
3:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Census Bureau Survey Indicates How Americans Live

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep with some new information about us. The Census Bureau conducts the American Community Survey every year. It's an annual snapshot of who Americans are and how we live, and it's kind of like Christmas morning for demographers such as William Frey of the Brookings Institution. We asked him what trends he sees this year.

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Shots - Health News
3:20 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Employers Trim Health Costs By Cutting Coverage For Spouses

Workers prepare orders to be loaded for shipment at a UPS Healthcare Supply Chain and Distribution Center in Atlanta on March 12. The company recently announced that it would no longer offer coverage for spouses who had their own job-based insurance.
Robin Nelson Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 10:05 am

When UPS told workers that it would no longer offer health coverage for spouses who had their own job-based insurance, it caused a big stir. But the shipping giant has plenty of company.

So many employers are trying to cut back on health coverage for spouses that it has become a trend. The practice began well before the Affordable Care Act passed, and the connection to the law, in some cases, isn't that direct.

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