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7:20 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Lights Go Out During Ravens' News Conference

A blackout delayed last season's Super Bowl as the Baltimore Ravens defeated San Francisco. As the Raven's coach was taking questions Sunday, the room was plunged into darkness. Quarterback Joe Flacco accidentally leaned on a light switch. Later, linebacker Terrell Suggs did the same thing.

The Two-Way
6:27 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Researchers From U.S., Germany, Share Nobel Prize For Medicine

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 2:42 pm

Two Americans, James Rothman and Randy Schekman, and German-born researcher Thomas Südhof have won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for "solving the mystery of how the cell organizes its transport system," according to the Nobel committee.

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Economy
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

What's The Cost Of Budget Gridlock?

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:33 am

Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about the cost of the government shutdown, and the dangers of the threatened government default.

Research News
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Nobel Prize Awarded In Medicine

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. This year's Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine will go to three scientists who have figured out how cells package up material - like hormones - and how they deliver those materials to other cells. This is one of the most basic functions for living cells and diseases can result when the machinery goes awry, so it's important to understand.

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Analysis
4:55 am
Mon October 7, 2013

No Political Compromise Keeps Most Federal Offices Closed

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 6:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And with some perspective on why the two sides are so dug in, and what options Speaker Boehner and President Obama may be weighing, we turn as we do most Mondays to Cokie Roberts. Good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi. How are you, Renee?

MONTAGNE: And Cokie, given what Tamara just reported, that a small but very key group of Republicans are unlikely to go along with a possible solution to the next crisis that's looming - that's a possible default on the national debt - what does Speaker Boehner do?

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All Tech Considered
3:07 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Wanted: A New Generation Of High-Tech Aviation Workers

The Wright Brothers Flyer lifts off in Kitty Hawk, N.C., on Dec. 17, 1903. Now 110 years later, a thriving aviation industry is looking to fill jobs in high-tech manufacturing.
AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 10:53 am

Across North Carolina, many license plates read "First in Flight" — a tribute to Orville and Wilbur Wright. Their plane first flew there 110 years ago.

Today, the state has one of the nation's busiest airports and dozens of aviation companies. And finding workers to fill those jobs has been a challenge.

No longer are workers building legs of furniture, hemming shirts and rolling cigarettes. They're fixing GPS technology, working on stabilizers and manufacturing the next era of aviation.

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Law
3:06 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Despite Shutdown, Supreme Court Opens Its Doors For New Term

The Supreme Court opens its new term this week.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 11:09 am

When the rest of the government shuts down for a blizzard, the U.S. Supreme Court soldiers on. And so it is that this week, with the rest of the government shut down in a political deep freeze, the high court, being deemed essential, is open for business.

It is, after all, not just any week for the justices. It is the opening of a new term.

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Author Interviews
3:06 am
Mon October 7, 2013

In 'Egghead,' A New Shel: Burnham Takes On Silverstein

Chance Bone Courtesy of Grand Central Publishing

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:16 pm

Bo Burnham posted his first video on the Internet late in 2006, when a little website called YouTube was still in its infancy. He was 17 years old then — just a high school junior singing a few funny songs on his bed at home.

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Sports
3:05 am
Mon October 7, 2013

When It Comes To Brain Injury, Authors Say NFL Is In A 'League Of Denial'

Dave Duerson (right), in 1988. Duerson committed suicide in 2011 and wrote a note that included this request: "Please see that my brain is given to the NFL's brain bank."
AP

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 5:41 pm

When the Pittsburgh Steelers won four Super Bowls in the 1970s, you could argue that no one played a bigger role than Mike Webster. Webster was the Steelers' center, snapping the ball to the quarterback, then waging war in the trenches, slamming his body and helmet into defensive players to halt their rush.

He was a local hero, which is why the city was stunned when his life fell apart. He lost all his money, and his marriage, and ended up spending nights in the bus terminal in Pittsburgh. Webster died of a heart attack, and on Sept. 28, 2002, came the autopsy.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 am
Mon October 7, 2013

For Boys With Eating Disorders, Finding Treatment Can Be Hard

Jonathan Noyes started binging on food after a stressful period in his family's life, including his father's job loss and his grandmother's cancer.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:36 am

Last year, Kathy Noyes began to notice that her 12-year-old son, Jonathan, was eating more than usual. She caught him eating late at night. She found empty peanut butter jars and chip and cookie bags stashed around the house.

She didn't know what to make of it. Her friends said, "Well, my boys eat a lot too. They're growing boys. Just wait till you get your grocery bill when they're 16."

But Jonathan soon started to be sent home from school frequently because he was sick.

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