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4:26 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Farm Bill Cuts Might Cut Conservation, Too

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Farm programs will likely cost the government less under any new farm bill, but the policy could be bad for the environment. Both House and Senate versions would end a big subsidy, called direct payments, that has paid money to land owners — whether they needed it or not — if they complied with certain conservation regulations. The two chambers' versions of the bill differ on how, or even if, to incent farmers to take care of their land. But both versions would stop funding to keep at least five million acres of land out of production.

The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Police Arrest Hundreds In Global Child Porn Sting

Toronto police say they've cracked a massive child porn network, rescuing 386 children around the world and nabbing hundreds of suspects, including teachers, clergymen and doctors.

Of the 348 people arrested worldwide, 108 were in Canada and 76 in the U.S. Project Spade, as the sweep is known, is described by Canadian police as one of the largest-ever child porn busts.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
3:46 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Amir ElSaffar And Two Rivers On JazzSet

Two Rivers achieves long meters at breakneck speeds, even in non-Western modes and odd.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 9:33 am

"I feel as though there's almost two streams going through my veins, two bloodstreams," says trumpeter and composer Amir ElSaffar, leader of Two Rivers. "A lot of my life has been about reconciling the two."

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World Cafe
3:30 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Latin Roots: Rachel Faro On Candombe

Ruben Rada.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 4:25 pm

On this installment of World Cafe's Latin Roots series, music producer and singer-songwriter Rachel Faro discusses an Afro-Uruguayan style of Latin music called Candombe.

Separated by a river from Argentina and nestled next to southern Brazil, Uruguay experienced the same influx of African slaves as Brazil, which resulted in a similar but often overlooked musical impact. Played on sets of three drums, Candombe is highly rhythmic; it's been an integral part of carnival celebrations for centuries.

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World Cafe
3:03 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Okkervil River On World Cafe

Lead singer Will Sheff (above center) and Okkervil River.
Ben Sklar Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:26 pm

Today's Vintage Cafe is a studio performance from the Austin band Okkervil River. The music performed here, from 2013's The Silver Gymnasium, pays homage to singer Will Sheff's life as a boy in Meriden, N.H., during the late '80s.

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Mountain Stage
2:56 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Red Baraat On Mountain Stage

Red Baraat performs live on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 9:34 am

Red Baraat appears on this special 800th episode of Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences in Charleston, W.V. The Brooklyn band's eight members draw on North Indian rhythms, hip-hop, funk and New Orleans jazz to create undeniably singular party music. The band has performed during its own TED Talk, at the White House and at Google's Mountain View headquarters, and closed the 2012 Paralympic Games.

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Shots - Health News
2:44 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

The plate on the left contains about equal numbers of colonies of two different bacteria. After the bacteria compete and evolve, the lighter ones have taken the lead in the plate on the right.
Courtesy of Michael Wiser

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

Evolution is relentless process that seems to keep going and going, even when creatures live in a stable, unchanging world.

That's the latest surprise from a unique experiment that's been underway for more than a quarter-century.

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The Salt
2:41 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Philadelphia Children's Hospital Bars Herbs And Supplements

Dietary supplements are generally defined as vitamins, minerals, herbs and extracts. They're regulated as a unique category of food by the Food and Drug Administration.
iStockphoto.com

One of the nation's largest and oldest children's hospitals is cracking down on parents who bring their kids herbs, extracts or other dietary supplements.

In what it describes as a break from other hospitals, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, or CHOP, last month removed most dietary supplements from its list of approved medicines, and established new policies for administering them.

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Animals
2:35 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Old Dogs, New Data: Canines May Have Been Domesticated In Europe

A dog burial in Greene County, Ill. This fossil dates back to about 8,500 years ago.
Courtesy of Del Baston, Center for American Archaeology

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 8:34 pm

Scientists have used some new tricks and old dogs to show that thousands of years ago, wolves may have first become man's best friend in Europe.

Researchers extracted DNA from ancient wolf or dog fossils and compared it with DNA from modern dog breeds and wolves. Until recently, labs didn't have the kind of genetic tools they'd need to work with such old dog DNA and do this kind of detailed comparison.

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Movie Interviews
2:17 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Actor Bruce Dern Gets Up Close And Personal In 'Nebraska'

Bruce Dern has been acting for more than 50 years. In Nebraska, he plays a man on a mission to collect $1 million.
Merie W. Wallace Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 4:08 pm

After spending much of his career in supporting roles, actor Bruce Dern is finally getting some recognition: He won the best actor award at this year's Cannes Film Festival for his performance in the new film Nebraska.

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