Music
5:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Musician Gustavo Santaololla: Exceptional Yet Incredibly Varied

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. It takes a special kind of person to blaze a trail. A bit later this hour, we'll hear from actress Rita Moreno about her amazing life from her childhood in Puerto Rico to the harrowing boat trip that brought her to New York City to becoming an acclaimed actress, singer and dancer and a mainstay of American stage and screen. But now...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Author Interviews
5:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Novel Explores 'Silence' And 'Roar' Of Life In A Place Like Syria

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

The Silence and the Roar follows a young man living in an unnamed Middle Eastern country that is in chaos. The book doesn't explicitly take place in Syria, but the similarities between its setting and author Nihad Sirees' home country are undeniable.

Sirees' work has been banned from publication in Syria, where he's considered an opponent of the government — another point at which Sirees' story and that of his protagonist, Fathi Chin, intersect.

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Author Interviews
5:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Rita Moreno Reflects On Anita, Awards And Accents

Rita Moreno won an Academy Award in 1962 for her role as Anita in West Side Story.
AP

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 1:55 pm

You could hardly design a better Hollywood success story than that of powerhouse Rita Moreno: Born Rosa Dolores Alverio in Puerto Rico, she arrived in New York when she was 5 years old. Over the years, she became a talented dancer and ended up in Hollywood, making her mark in musicals like Singin' in the Rain and The King and I before winning an Oscar for her unforgettable turn as Anita in West Side Story.

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Arts & Life
5:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

It's 'Literally' In The Dictionary

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to take a moment now to talk about a word - yep, one word. Maybe you use it all the time or maybe you feel people use the word and it drives you up the wall. I'm talking about the word literally.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Sunday Puzzle
12:33 am
Sun March 10, 2013

From A To Z

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a word containing an A and a Z. Given anagrams of the remaining letters, name the word. For example, given "leg," the answer would be "glaze".

Last week's challenge: Eight people are seated at a circular table. Each person gets up and sits down again — either in the same chair or in the chair immediately to the left or right of the one they were in. How many different ways can the eight people be re-seated?

Answer: 49

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Pop Culture
12:03 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Thirty Years Later, Still 'A Good-Old-Boy Thing'

James Best played Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane, the bumbling minion of Jefferson Davis "Boss" Hogg, a corrupt county commissioner and the show's Big Bad. Rosco's dog Flash was played by a basset hound named Sandy.
CBS Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:43 am

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Three-Minute Fiction
6:04 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 10 Winner Is ...

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Lisa Rubenson of Charlotte, N.C., wrote our Round 10 winning story, "Sorry for Your Loss."
Courtesy of Lisa Rubenson

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 6:26 am

Did you leave a message after our prompt? For Round 10 of Three-Minute Fiction, we asked you to submit a short story in the form of a voice mail message. For this contest, the original fiction must be read in about three minutes, no more than 600 words.

After four weeks and more than 4,000 stories, we have a winner.

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The Two-Way
5:55 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Venezuela Sets Date To Elect Chavez's Successor

A woman wipes photos of late President Hugo Chavez at a makeshift altar for him in the main square of Sabaneta, western Venezuela, on Saturday.
Esteban Felix AP

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 8:57 am

  • Listen to the full story on Hugo Chavez's legacy on All Things Considered

Venezuela's elections commission announced Saturday that voters will go to the polls on April 14 to choose a successor to President Hugo Chavez, who died this week after a battle with cancer.

The nation's constitution mandated that an election be called within 30 days of Chavez's death on March 5, but the scheduled date falls outside of that window. Nicolas Maduro, Chavez's vice president, was sworn in as interim leader on Friday.

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Science
5:11 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Scientists Make Plans To Blast Threatening Asteroids

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 7:41 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "ARMAGEDDON")

STANLEY ANDERSON: (as the President) What is this thing?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: It's enormous.

BILLY BOB THORNTON: (as Dan Truman) It's an asteroid, sir.

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

In the 1998 film "Armageddon," the character played by Bruce Willis saves the Earth by knocking aside an asteroid headed straight for us. Pure fiction, right? Well, maybe not.

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Music
5:11 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Orchestra Helps Deaf 'Feel' Its Music

Originally published on Sat March 9, 2013 6:04 pm

The National Orchestra of Wales has come up with a way to make music more inclusive: by opening it up to the deaf community. Freelance musician Andy Pidcock worked with the Orchestra to come up with a "sound box." Through vibrations, it transmits music to deaf people who can put their hands on it or even lie on top of it. Pidcock talks about it with Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden. And, through an interpreter, Kate Galloway describes what it is like to feel music in this way.

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