Arts

First Reads
7:03 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Exclusive First Read: Kate Atkinson's 'Life After Life'

  • Listen to the Excerpt

On a snowy night in 1910, a baby girl is born — and dies before she can take her first breath. She is born — and grows up to become an assassin who eliminates Hitler before he can take power. She is born — and lives a handful of different lives in a Britain descending into war; the book jumps from one narrative to another with a dreamy sort of logic. "Time isn't circular," she tells a therapist at one point. "It's like a ... palimpsest. ...

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The Salt
3:43 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Reviving The Spirit And Schmaltz Of The Jewish Deli

Nick Wiseman, partner at DGS Delicatessen, inspects the kitchen as an employee prepares pastrami sandwiches for lunch in Washington, D.C.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:55 am

  • Hear David Greene's Story

On a recent morning, just south of Washington, D.C.'s Dupont Circle, about a dozen people are lined up outside a restaurant waiting for its lunchtime opening.

Jon and Ralph Rosenbaum are at the front of the line and are the first to be greeted by DGS Delicatessen general manager Brian Zipin, who leads them down a white tile hallway and seats them at a small table against a brick-exposed wall.

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Movies
5:33 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Hollywood's History Of Putting Gay Rights On Trial

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:55 pm

With the Supreme Court hearing arguments this week on same-sex marriage, I'd like to point out a parallel evolution in what I see as a Hollywood mini-genre: films in which gay characters are either taken to court or seek redress in court for issues involving their sexuality.

Arguably the most famous question ever asked in a courtroom about a line of poetry — "What is the love that dare not speak its name?" — was originally put to playwright Oscar Wilde in 1894 by a British prosecutor. It was an attempt to trap Wilde into admitting to then-illegal homosexual conduct.

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Arts
4:37 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Cabbage

Hi, I'm Maria Filosa from WDIY and you're listening to Tasty Seasonal Recipes for the Everyday Chef. Lately I've been on a cabbage kick. This leafy green member of the brassica family of vegetables is nutrient rich, versatile and inexpensive. Some of the other members of this family are cauliflower, kale, broccoli and brussel sprouts.

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Arts
4:20 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Allentown Public Theatre presents: Parallel Lives

Host Kate Scuffle and George Miller talk with Samantha Beedle and Joshua Neth about the Allentown Public Theatre's performance of Parallel Lives, a sketch-comedy that takes an amusing look at relationships, women's roles in society and gender issues.  Parallel Lives runs through April 6th at the Antonio Salemme Foundation, 542 W. Hamilton St. Allentown. 

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Arts
4:06 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Earth Day

It is important to think of every day as earth day.  Remember that it is our repeated daily actions that affect the earth.

Water is a precious resource, so use only the water you need, and reuse it when possible.

A buried cistern or rain barrels can save the water from your roof so you can use it instead of drinkable water to irrigate your plants or flush your toilets.

Drip irrigation or soaker hoses use 1/10th as much water as spray or flood irrigation and the water gets to the roots where it is needed rather than evaporating.

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Book Reviews
2:09 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

The Apathy In 'A Thousand Pardons' Is Hard To Forgive

iStockPhoto

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 4:32 pm

Jonathan Dee likes to write about rich, good-looking people falling apart — and who among the 99 percent of us can't enjoy that plot? In The Privileges, the dad of the family was a Wall Street trader, tempted by existential boredom into larceny; in A Thousand Pardons, the dad of the family is a partner in a New York law firm, tempted by existential boredom into a disastrous workplace affair.

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Television
2:09 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Chris Hayes: From 'Up' In The Morning To 'All In' At Night

Anchor Chris Hayes will host a new MSNBC weeknight show beginning April 1.
Virginia Sherwood MSNBC

On Monday evening on MSNBC, All In with Chris Hayes will premiere, making the 34-year-old the youngest prime-time anchor on any of the major cable news channels. For the past 18 months, he has hosted an early morning weekend show — Up with Chris Hayes — on MSNBC, but he's already a familiar face to MSNBC evening viewers: He has frequently filled in for Rachel Maddow and has been a popular guest on her show.

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The Salt
1:47 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

The Wonderful World Of Whisky Art

courtesy of Ernie Button

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 11:44 am

Ernie Button was putting a Scotch glass left out overnight into the dishwasher when he noticed something — a white, chalky film on the bottom of the glass. He held it up to the light and, upon closer inspection, could see a series of fine, lacy lines running along the inside of the glass.

As a hobbyist photographer whose work often focuses on showcasing the beauty of everyday objects, Button was intrigued by this discovery. "Wow, there's something to that," he recalls thinking.

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