Arts

Architecture
3:24 am
Mon April 29, 2013

How One Family Built America's Public Palaces

The elaborately tiled City Hall subway station in New York City — still extant but now closed to the public, alas — used the Guastavino touch to convince wary city dwellers to head underground for a train trip.
Michael Freeman National Buildling Museum

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:52 am

A Washington, D.C., museum wants you to spend some time looking up — to see soaring, vaulted tile ceilings built by a father-son team who left their mark on some of America's most important public spaces.

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Author Interviews
4:48 pm
Sun April 28, 2013

Iran's Political Scene Is Sketchy For Cartoonists

"War" by Touka Neyestani: Neyestani received a degree in architecture from Tehran's Science and Industry University, and has been a cartoonist for more than 30 years.
International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 12:32 pm

Iranian newspapers are rife with cartoons. They are a tradition, and play a big role voicing criticism of the country's authoritarian regime.

Increasingly, though, Iranian cartoonists have been imprisoned, received death threats, or gone into exile because of their work.

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Poetry
7:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Dilruba Ahmed: An Outsider Turns To Poetry

promo image

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate, Weekend Edition is talking with younger poets about why they chose to write poetry and why it's still important in our everyday lives. This week, we spoke to Bangladeshi-American poet Dilruba Ahmed.

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Three Books...
7:03 am
Sun April 28, 2013

What's Cooking? 3 Books That Are More Filling Than Food

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 3:41 pm

Foodie fiction has become a veritable genre, devoted to deliciousness, to making your mouth water, to making you feel suddenly, irrevocably starved — and to making everything, sprouts and bologna included, an aphrodisiac. But what happens when enough is enough? Or when, perhaps, you're on a diet, or a deserted island, or attempting celibacy, or learning to live without gluten? What happens when you're hungry for the kind of fiction that concerns food but isn't in love with food — and thereby won't make you hungry, or lustful, or both?

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Sunday Puzzle
5:01 am
Sun April 28, 2013

As You Know, Puzzles Are A Pastime

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

On-air challenge: For each given category, name something in the category where the first letter is also the first letter of the category. For example, given "Military Ranks," you would say "Major."

Last week's challenge: Name a geographical location in two words — nine letters altogether — that, when spoken aloud, sounds roughly like four letters of the alphabet. What is it?

Answer: Aegean Sea; Indian Cay

Winner: Terry Thacker, Greenville, S.C.

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Code Switch
6:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

'I'm The Café And He's The Leche'

Café de Leche owner Anya Schodorf grew up in Managua, Nicaragua, and came to the U.S. when she was 14.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:06 pm

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Television
4:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Two Daytime Soaps Return, But Will Fans Follow Online?

New episodes of All My Children will be airing on Hulu starting Monday.
Hulu

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 3:15 pm

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Author Interviews
4:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Hard Hits, Hard Liquor In 'The Summer of Beer and Whiskey'

PublicAffairs

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 6:13 pm

The summer of 1883 proved to be a pivotal time for American baseball.

A brash German immigrant and beer garden owner, Chris Von der Ahe strode onto the scene to found a new franchise, the St. Louis Browns — a team that would later become the St. Louis Cardinals.

His motivation? To sell more beer. And while he made a fortune, he also changed the sport forever.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Just In Time For Poetry Month, Four Fantastic Books Of Verse

Andreas Rentz Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:52 am

April is National Poetry Month, and what better way to celebrate than with new poetry releases? Here are four of this month's highlights — a new translation, a "best of" collection, a "collected works" worth revisiting and a camera-eye view of the world.

The Divine Comedy

The season premiere of Mad Men opened with John Ciardi's 1954 translation of Dante's Inferno:

Midway in our life's journey, I went astray
from the straight road and woke to find myself
alone in a dark wood.

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Author Interviews
6:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

'Country Girl' Edna O'Brien On A Lifetime Of Lit, Loneliness And Love

Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 3:57 pm

When Edna O'Brien wrote The Country Girls in 1960, the book was acclaimed by critics, banned by the Irish Censorship Board and burned in churches for suggesting that the two small-town girls at the center of the book had romantic lives. Oh, why be obscure? Sex lives.

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