Arts

The Salt
1:09 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

Food Trucks, Share The Lane. Food Bikes Are Merging Into The Business

Charlie Wicker of Trailhead Coffee Roasters makes all of his deliveries within the 6-mile radius of urban Portland, Ore., on one of his custom-built cargo bikes. He can also pull over to brew and serve coffee.
John Lee Courtesy of Trailhead Coffee Roasters

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 1:17 pm

When upscale food trucks roared into popularity a few years ago, the folks running them praised their rolling operations as far cheaper and simpler to launch than a bricks-and-mortar restaurant.

Now, entrepreneurs are finding similar advantages in food bikes.

Brewers, chefs, baristas and even farmers are turning to pedal-powered vehicles to bring their goods to consumers — and, sometimes, actually produce them on the street.

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Monkey See
10:04 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Selma' And Dramatic License

NPR

This week's show — which was taped before Thursday's Oscar nominations — is focused on Ava DuVernay's drama Selma, and we're happy to be joined by our pal and Code Switch blogger Gene Demby, who also recently wrote a terrific piece in Politico about what he talked about as a new civil rights movement. It made sense, we thought, to make sure he was with us to cover a movie about the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

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Alt.Latino
8:08 am
Fri January 16, 2015

History Goes To The Illustrators: 'A Contrarian History Of The United States'

A Most Imperfect Union champions the progress and ideals of the U.S. while recognizing its missteps.
Lalo Alcaraz Courtesy of the artist

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The Two-Way
10:24 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Boy Says He Didn't Go To Heaven; Publisher Says It Will Pull Book

Alex Malarkey, seen here in a 2009 photo, has written an open letter saying that events described in the best-seller The Boy Who Came Back from Heaven were made up.
John Kuntz The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 12:36 pm

Nearly five years after it hit best-seller lists, a book that purported to be a 6-year-old boy's story of visiting angels and heaven after being injured in a bad car crash is being pulled from shelves. The young man at the center of The Boy Who Came Back from Heaven, Alex Malarkey, said this week that the story was all made up.

The book's publisher, Tyndale House, had promoted it as "a supernatural encounter that will give you new insights on Heaven, angels, and hearing the voice of God."

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Movies
4:51 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

'Birdman,' 'Grand Budapest Hotel' Lead Oscar Nominations

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 6:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arts
3:09 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

George VanDoren & Marilyn Hazleton Discuss the Upcoming Student Poetry Project on LV Arts Salon

George VanDoren from The Press Papers and poet Marilyn Hazleton join hosts George Miller and Kate Scuffle on Lehigh Valley Arts Salon to talk about the 10th Annual Student Poetry Project. Find out how Lehigh Valley students can get involved.

In honor of April being National Poetry Month, WDIY is once again partnering with The Press Papers to allow student winners to read their poems on an April edition of Lehigh Valley Arts Salon.

(Original air-date: 1/12/2015)

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Arts
1:34 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

A Tribute to Those We Lost in 2014 on LV Discourse

John Pearce pays tribute to notables who died during 2014.  It's our annual honor to people who have made a difference in our world -- local, national and international.

(Original air-date: 1/1/2015)

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The Salt
11:55 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Mojito Diplomacy: Chefs Plan Culinary Tours To Cuba

A vendor reaches out to catch a pineapple at a food market in the outskirts of Havana.
Ramon Espinosa AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 3:11 pm

Miami Chef Douglas Rodriguez is known as the "Godfather of Nuevo Latino Cuisine" for the pan-Latin American style of cooking he helped pioneer. But, as the son of Cuban immigrants, his early cooking education was firmly rooted in the traditions of his parents' homeland.

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Book Reviews
10:03 am
Thu January 15, 2015

The Consolations (And Controversies) Of Philosophy In 'The Just City'

A friend recently insisted I read her favorite book in the world: The Last of the Wine by Mary Renault. It's a gorgeous book, one that utterly immerses you in a worldview that's simultaneously alien and formative to so much of our modern life. I enjoyed it tremendously, and am doubly glad I read it since it gave me a fascinating window through which to view Jo Walton's The Just City: If Renault's project is immersive, Walton's is explosive, deliberately troubling and provocative as the gadfly-Socrates who appears in both.

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Monkey See
9:35 am
Thu January 15, 2015

At The Oscar Nominations, It's A Good Year To Be An Idiosyncratic Man

In Birdman, Michael Keaton (a real-life former Batman) plays a former movie superhero who's trying to get a grasp on his career.
Atsushi Nishijima/ Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 1:26 pm

[At the top of this post, you'll find a discussion I had with Stephen Thompson, my Pop Culture Happy Hour co-panelist, about the Oscar nominations. Tomorrow's full PCHH episode more fully covers the film Selma.]

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