All Things Considered

Every weekday, NPR's All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. Alongside national programming, WDIY presents Lehigh Valley news, traffic updates, weather forecasts, and special features.

When a fast-moving, erratic wildfire ignites, firefighters right away try to save homes and steer the flames away from life and property. But experts say the real danger often occurs in the hours after the big wall of flames rips through.

In the their new book, Trump Revealed: An American Journey of Ambition, Ego, Money and Power, Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher of The Washington Post tell the story of Donald Trump's rise as a businessman, a political candidate, but above all, as a brand.

This sentence from the book captures the proliferation of the Trump brand:

One of the last medals awarded at the Rio Olympics went to a 21-year-old middleweight boxer from Flint, Mich.: Claressa Shields.

It was gold. With that Sunday victory, Shields became the first U.S. boxer ever to win back-to-back gold medals.

On the podium, after the medal was slipped around her neck, she reached into her pocket, pulled out her gold medal from the 2012 London Games and draped that one over her head, too.

Voice actor and comedian H. Jon Benjamin released a jazz album in which he plays piano. Unfortunately, he cannot play the piano at all. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Benjamin about his album Well, I Should Have...Learned How to Play Piano. This story originally aired on Jan. 19, 2016 on All Things Considered.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

FARAI CHIDEYA, HOST:

Recently, on a hot summer morning with cumulus clouds towering overhead, black cattle grazed in South Florida fields, dotting the horizon along with clumps of palm trees. At the Big Cypress Reservation, Moses Jumper is a tribal elder and owner of nearly 300 head — and a fourth-generation cattleman.

Young, healthy people referred to as "young invincibles" pose a serious challenge to the success of President Obama's expanded health care coverage, the Affordable Care Act. Kaiser Health's Julie Rovner explains more about this group of uninsured Americans.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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