I Smell A Rat

Mar 16, 2018
Originally published on March 19, 2018 3:27 pm

It's time to RATchet up the stakes: the answer to each question in this final round game contains the consecutive letters R-A-T.

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

It's time to crown our big winner. Let's bring back our finalists - Rebekah Shoemake (ph), who's an enemy of a squirrel rights' activist, and Danielle Mebert (ph), who uses semicolons in texts.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru Art Chung, take it away.

ART CHUNG: Danielle and Rebekah, your final round is called I Smell A Rat. Every answer contains the consecutive letters are R-A-T somewhere in the answer. But those letters may or may not be pronounced rat. So if I said, Kelvin, Fahrenheit and Celsius are measurements of what, you'd answer temperature. Our big winner will receive an ASK ME ANOTHER Rubik's Cube signed by William Jackson Harper. We rolled the 20-sided die backstage and Danielle is going first. Here we go. Danielle, this 2007 Disney Pixar movie won the Oscar for best animated film.

DANIELLE MEBERT: "Ratatouille."

CHUNG: That's right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, this reptile uses the vibration of interlocking keratin rings to make its signature sound.

REBEKAH SHOEMAKE: Oh, a rattlesnake.

CHUNG: That is right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Danielle, he was the first Latino cast member of "Saturday Night Live" when he joined the show in 1998.

MEBERT: Horatio Sanz.

CHUNG: That is right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, this news anchor retired from "CBS Evening News" in 2005.

SHOEMAKE: Dan Rather.

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Danielle, this Middle Eastern nation goes by the initialism UAE.

MEBERT: United Arab Emirates.

CHUNG: That's right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, this federal agency goes by the initialism FDA.

SHOEMAKE: The Food and Drug Administration.

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Danielle, Grover Cleveland was the first president elected after the Civil War from this political party.

MEBERT: Democrats?

CHUNG: Yes. Democrat or Democratic Party. That's correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, a board game where children perform hilarious medical procedures on a patient named Cavity Sam.

(LAUGHTER)

SHOEMAKE: Operation.

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: We're at the halfway point. The game is tied at four points each. Danielle, according to Plato, this philosopher said an unexamined life is not worth living. Shaking your head. Three seconds.

MEBERT: Herodotus?

CHUNG: No, I'm sorry. We're looking for Socrates. Rebekah, mathematical concept known as phi, expressed in decimal form as 1.618033988 and so on.

SHOEMAKE: Oh, an irrational number.

CHUNG: Could you be more specific?

SHOEMAKE: I don't know.

CHUNG: What we were looking for was the golden ratio. Danielle, literary device where consecutive words have similar sounding starts.

MEBERT: Alliteration.

CHUNG: That is right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, medical pledge that boils down to first, do no harm.

SHOEMAKE: The Hippocratic Oath.

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Danielle, French painter known for his technique of pointillism and his masterpiece, "A Sunday On La Grande Jatte."

MEBERT: Seurat.

CHUNG: That is correct, Georges Seurat.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, this home furnishing chain opened its first outlet in Chicago in 1962.

SHOEMAKE: Crate and Barrel?

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: The score is tied at six points each. You each have one question left. Danielle, in November 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman since 1977 to win this New York City event.

MEBERT: The marathon, New York City marathon.

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Rebekah, this is the last question. You must answer correctly to stay in the game. From the Italian for innkeeper or restaurant owner, what word refers to a restaurant that serves Italian cuisine?

SHOEMAKE: Oh. Oh, no. Trattoria.

CHUNG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Well done.

(APPLAUSE)

CHUNG: You guys are doing great. Here's your tiebreaker. Hands on your buzzer. It's a type of German sausage.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Danielle.

MEBERT: Bratwurst.

CHUNG: That is correct. Congratulations.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Rebekah, amazing. Thank you so much. Well done. Congratulations, Danielle. And that's our show. ASK ME ANOTHER's puzzle guru is Art Chung.

CHUNG: Hey, my name anagrams to narc thug.

EISENBERG: Our house musician is Jonathan Coulton.

CHUNG: Thou jolt a canon.

EISENBERG: Our puzzles were written by Madeline Kaplan, Mary Tobler and senior writers Josiah Madigan (ph) and J. Keith van Straaten. ASK ME ANOTHER's produced by Mike Katzif, Travis Larchuk, Julia Melfi, Denny Shin, Rommel Wood and our intern Camilla Franklin along with Steve Nelson and Anya Grundmann. We were recorded by Damon Whittemore, Frank Bianco (ph) and David Hurtgen. We'd like to thank our home in Brooklyn, N.Y., at The Bell House...

CHUNG: Hot heel blues.

EISENBERG: ...And our production partner, WNYC. I'm her ripe begonias.

CHUNG: Ophira Eisenberg.

EISENBERG: And this was ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.