Ask Me Another
9:42 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Hidden Vegetables

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 11:22 am

Your parents might have snuck your veggies into unexpected dishes, but we got clever and hid the names of vegetables in the answers of this game. What German composer was a fan of red, edible roots?

Plus, hear Jonathan Coulton lead the crowd in a rowdy rendition of "Blister In The Sun" by the Milwaukee-bred rockers Violent Femmes.

Heard in Episode 316: Meet Me In Milwaukee

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

For our last game before the final round, let's bring out Julie Bamberger Roubik and Leonie Dolch.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Lovely to meet you both.

Julie, you teach violin and viola at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music.

JULIE BAMBERGER ROUBIK: Yes, I do.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: That is fantastic. And I'm told you are secretly trying to get your students to switch from violin to viola.

ROUBIK: It's not a secret.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: You just go, come on, you got to do this, it's better?

ROUBIK: Yes.

EISENBERG: Why.

ROUBIK: The viola just speaks to me. It has a mellowness and a richness and I just love being in the center of harmony. And not enough people really understand the true value of the viola and there's a lot of fun to be had.

EISENBERG: Now Leonie, you host a radio show in Madison, "Her Infinite Variety."

LEONIE DOLCH: I do.

EISENBERG: And you are an urban chicken farmer.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Yeah.

DOLCH: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

DOLCH: It's true.

EISENBERG: What are the names of your chickens?

DOLCH: Well, we started with Reba, Dolly, Loretta and June.

(APPLAUSE)

DOLCH: We lost Loretta to a drought and we just lost June to a hawk just a couple months ago, so...

EISENBERG: Oh, I'm sorry.

AUDIENCE: Aw.

DOLCH: It was sad.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So we've got Dolly and...

DOLCH: Dolly and Reba are left.

EISENBERG: And Reba.

DOLCH: Yes.

EISENBERG: Now these are pets?

DOLCH: I wouldn't take 'em to the vet.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So, let's say you mildly care about.... Well, this game is called Hidden Vegetables because we can't only eat frozen custard and cheese curds all day, can we Jonathan?

JONATHAN COULTON: Well, we can't and we shouldn't. And...

(SOUNDBITE OF BUILDING FROM THE AUDIENCE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Why not?

EISENBERG: This audience is so earnest and sensitive.

COULTON: I don't think I like - they're very sensitive.

DOLCH: You were offending the Sconnie.

EISENBERG: The Sconnie.

COULTON: We just said that you can't eat all day. We didn't say that you should never eat it.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIENCE CHATTER)

ROUBIK: That doesn't work either.

COULTON: Still angry. They're still mad.

EISENBERG: No. I think someone went, ah.

COULTON: Ah.

EISENBERG: Ah, OK.

COULTON: And then the rest of them were like, oh, we booing? Are we booing now? Boo.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: The thing is, do you think a body like this happens by accident? It doesn't.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: It's because I eat healthy and I tried to get my kids to eat healthy.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: But, of course, vegetables are terrible and everyone knows it. So sometimes you have to hide the vegetables inside something else. And that is what we are doing in this game. We have hidden vegetables in each answer. Puzzle guru, Art Chung, help out an example.

ART CHUNG: If we said this director a "Platoon" and "JFK" loves conspiracy theories and little green and black discs on his pizza, the answer would be Oliver Stone with the hidden vegetables being an olive. And yes, technically, an olive is a fruit, but we're talking about vegetables in a culinary sense here.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Oh. Yeah.

CHUNG: I know. I know. Don't tell me what's a vegetable and what's a fruit.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: So each clue will have some sort of hint as to the "vegetable," in quotes. But all we're looking for...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: All we're looking for in an answer is the full name or phrase. So you don't really need to say the vegetables. It's just a hint about the vegetable in there for you. OK? Here we go. This German composer of nine symphonies and the "Moonlight Sonata," loves putting edible red roots in his salad.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Julie.

ROUBIK: Beethoven?

COULTON: Beethoven or Beet hoven.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: As I like to say. That's correct.

EISENBERG: Yeah. Well done. What is the policy of making concessions to an enemy in order to avoid a threatened conflict, even if the concessions involve spherical green legumes?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

DOLCH: Peas talks?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Leonie says peas talks.

CHUNG: Oh, that's not what we're looking for.

EISENBERG: Come on, give peas a chance, Art.

(LAUGHTER)

CHUNG: All right. We'll give it to her.

EISENBERG: All right.

CHUNG: Yeah. Sure.

(APPLAUSE)

CHUNG: We were looking for appeasement.

AUDIENCE: Aw. Boo.

EISENBERG: But peas talks sounds way more fun and a possible new public radio show.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Peas talk.

EISENBERG: Peas talk. How do you say I am American in Spanish? It also sounds like an order at Starbucks.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Julie.

ROUBIK: Yo soy Americano?

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Soy Americano is what we were going for. Exactly. Which also sounds to me like a lactose intolerant enclave that lives out of the grid under Venti cups.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: What university whose main campus overlooks the Pacific Ocean in Malibu, California is the spicy home to the Smothers Theater and was the filming location for the 1970s show "Battle of the Network Stars?"

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Leonie?

DOLCH: Pepperdine?

COULTON: That's right. Pepperdine University.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Despite being an advocate for spinach, Popeye snuck a starch and some existentialism into one of his catch phrases, which was also the title 1933 short.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Julie.

ROUBIK: I am what I am and that's all that I am.

EISENBERG: Exactly. Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: All right. This is your last question. Who stars as Penny on "The Big Bang Theory" and should probably not be referred to as Cow Cabbage?

(LAUGHTER)

DOLCH: Oh. Oh.

COULTON: Oh, they are both tortured.

CHUNG: It's a very trendy vegetable.

EISENBERG: We always mention this vegetable.

CHUNG: It's NPR of vegetables.

EISENBERG: That's right.

(LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Yes, Julie?

ROUBIK: I'm not sure of the actress's name, but she played Blossom.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I like that when you just give another piece of trivia.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Leonie, any guesses?

DOLCH: Clover?

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: OK.

DOLCH: Clover?

COULTON: Stop. Stop. Stop.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Who is it, everybody?

AUDIENCE: Kaley Cuoco.

COULTON: Kaley Cuoco. Kaley Cuoco. Art, how'd they do?

CHUNG: Well, that was a tough game, but Julie was our winner.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Congratulations, Julie. You're going to be in our final round coming up right now.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BLISTER IN THE SUN")

(SOUNDBITE OF CLAPPING)

COULTON: (Singing) When I'm out walkin' I strut my stuff, man, I'm so strung out. I'm high as a kite, I just might stop to check you out. Let me go on like I blister in the sun. Let me go on, big hands, I know you're the one.

(Singing) Body and beats, I stain my sheets, I don't even know why. My girlfriend, she's at the end, she is starting to cry. Let me go on like I blister in the sun. Let me go on, big hands, I know you're the one.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLAPPING)

EISENBERG: Jonathan Coulton.

(APPLAUSE) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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