Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which keeps a 24/7 vigil on the sun, just released this spectacular video composite to mark five years since the spacecraft was launched.

Updates at 11:15 p.m. ET: One shooting victim dies

The Associated Press is reporting that one of the three shooting victims outside of the Copenhagen synagogue has died.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET: A second shooting in Copenhagen

Danish police say gunfire near a Copenhagen synagogue left one person shot in the head and two police officers injured, Reuters reports.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Police in Canada say they've foiled a Valentine's Day plot to carry out a mass shooting at a mall in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Dan Karpenchuk, reporting from Toronto for NPR, reports that one person was found dead and three others taken into custody on Friday by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in connection with the alleged plot, which authorities say was not related to Islamic terrorism. The suspects reportedly planned to kill as many people as possible before committing suicide.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A winter storm that has already dumped up to 8 inches of snow in parts of Michigan is set to bring blizzard conditions to much of the Northeast this weekend.

According to The Weather Channel, brutal winds, bitterly cold temperatures and lots of snow along the Eastern Seaboard from Long Island to Maine. New York and Philadelphia are among the cities under winter weather advisories.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists traded artillery fire today in the hours leading up to a cease-fire deal that went into effect at midnight (5 p.m. ET). A few seconds after the cease-fire officially began, Reuters reported, shelling abruptly stopped in the eastern city of Donetsk. A Russia Today correspondent in Donetsk called the region "eerily calm" after midnight.

President Obama today described as "brutal and outrageous" the murders of three young Muslims who were gunned down in North Carolina earlier this week, saying no one in the U.S. should be targeted for their religion.

Utah's GOP-controlled House of Representatives narrowly approved a proposal to bring back the state's use of firing squads for executions, but the measure faces an uncertain reception in the Senate.

The 39-34 vote Friday came as missing lawmakers were rounded up to break a deadlock. The firing squad was discontinued in 2004.

The Associated Press says leaders in the Republican-controlled Senate won't say whether they will support the measure and Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, also a Republican, has not said if he will sign it.

What happens when today's high-tech data storage systems become tomorrow's floppy discs?

Google Vice President Vint Cerf is concerned about the answer and its implications for preserving history. Speaking at a conference of top American scientists, Cerf described such a loss of important information as a possible "digital Dark Ages."

Suspected Boko Haram militants have conducted their first-ever raid in Chad, attacking a village just across the border from the extremist group's stronghold in northeast Nigeria.

Reuters says the assault took place about 12 miles east of the border at the village of Ngouboua inside Chad, which, like Nigeria, is a Muslim-majority country with a substantial Christian minority.

Something's definitely going on at NASA. We're thinking someone in the public relations department is trying to blow the dust off the space agency's ever-serious image.

First there was the photo below, deemed by almost anyone with a pulse as unquestionably the best astronaut portrait ever:

And now, the Expedition 45 crew, scheduled to go to the International Space Station in September, is having fun with Jedi robes and light sabers: