Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Iran's Supreme leader Ali Khamenei, speaking for the first time since protests broke out in his country last week, accuses "enemies of Iran" of meddling in the country.

At least 21 people have been killed in the protests that broke out throughout cities across the country since last Thursday, over Iran's weak economy and rising food prices.

Pakistan says it is preparing a response to President Trump, who wrote in a New Year's Day tweet that Islamabad was giving Washington only "lies & deceit" in exchange for billions of dollars in U.S. aid.

In the tweet, Trump accused Pakistan – a key U.S. anti-terrorism ally — of taking American leaders for "fools" and providing terrorists from neighboring Afghanistan "safe haven."

In an apparent reference to the $33 billion in aid that Trump says the U.S. has "foolishly" given Pakistan over the past 15 years, he signed off his tweet: "No more!"

One of two Milwaukee-area girls charged in the 2014 attempted murder of a classmate to impress a fictional horror character known as "Slender Man" was sentenced Thursday to 25 years in a mental hospital.

Anissa Weier, 16, had pleaded guilty in August to being a party to attempted second-degree homicide. However, a jury agreed in September with her claim that she was not responsible for her actions because of mental illness.

Doug Jones, the senator-elect from Alabama, says the campaign against his Republican rival, Roy Moore, was "surreal," but that ultimately, the tumultuous election came down to "kitchen table issues."

The Democrat's comments, during an appearance on NBC's Late Night with Seth Meyers early Friday, came as his opponent in the Dec. 12 special election to replace the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions had yet to concede — a full 10 days after the vote.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull called a vehicle attack that injured 19 people at an intersection in downtown Melbourne on Thursday a "shocking crime," that was nonetheless only an "isolated incident."

The alleged driver, 32-year-old Saeed Noori, is an Australian citizen of Afghan descent. He was arrested at the scene after allegedly driving an SUV through a crowd of holiday shoppers in the southern Australian city.

John Schnatter, the founder of the Papa John's pizza chain, will step down as CEO in the wake of controversial comments he made last month about the NFL's handling of the anthem protests.

Schnatter will be replaced on Jan. 1 by the company's chief operating officer, Steve Ritchie. Schnatter will remain chairman of the board.

The Royal Australian Navy's first submarine, which went down with all hands more than a century ago, has been located off Papua New Guinea in about 1,000 feet of water.

HMAS AE-1 vanished off Rabaul, Papua New Guinea, in the Duke of York islands on Sept. 14, 1914, less than three months after the start of World War I. The vessel had 35 crew aboard — Australians, British and one New Zealander.

Twelve previous government-funded searches over the years had failed to locate the submarine.

A car park in the English city of Leicester, where the remains of King Richard III were discovered five years ago, is now a protected monument.

Specifically, the location has been given scheduled monument status and described as "one of the most important sites in [the U.K.'s] ... national history."

Richard III famously met his fate on Aug. 22, 1485, at the climactic Battle of Bosworth, which ended the War of the Roses and ushered in England's House of Tudor.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

An SUV plowed through a group of pedestrians during rush hour Thursday in the city of Melbourne, injuring at least 19 people, in what police believe was a "deliberate act."

Two people are in custody after the incident near Flinders Street train station at about 4:45 p.m. local time in the southern Australian city of nearly 4 million people.

The Goodines of New Brunswick, Canada, will be spending Christmas apart for the first time in seven decades after the nursing home where the couple lived decided it was time to move 91-year-old Herbert Goodine to another facility.

The plight of the couple, married for 69 of their 73 years together, has sparked outrage in Canada after photos of their last moments together went viral on social media.

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