Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Pages

It's All Politics
5:08 am
Thu June 18, 2015

Raised Around Cry For Smaller Government, Rand Paul Carries The Torch

Sen. Rand Paul, then a candidate, arrives to address a luncheon meeting of the Lions Club in Bowling Green, Ky., in 2010. "He said when he was a very young man, 'I'm going to be a medical doctor,'" his nephew Matthew Pyeatt said. "He knew exactly what he wanted to be and exactly what he needed to do to get there and be successful."
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 9:04 am

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Sen. Rand Paul made headlines recently with his one-man effort to roll back government surveillance. And that's the just beginning of Paul's plan to dismantle big chunks of the federal government.

Read more
Health Care
5:32 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Obama Defends Health Care Law As Supreme Court Ruling Nears

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 8:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Politics
5:01 am
Thu May 28, 2015

The Future President Will Need To Wrestle With Debt From The Past

While annual deficits have shrunk dramatically since the depths of the Great Recession, the federal government is still adding to its overall debt.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:11 pm

Our next president is likely to have some big plans for the future of the country. But he or she will also have to wrestle with some leftover bills from the past. The federal government has issued trillions of dollars in IOUs. Just the interest on that massive debt could be a serious constraint for the next president.

That's why Danette Kenne has some questions for the presidential candidates about what kind of budget they plan to present to Congress.

"Being in Iowa, one of the things we can do is ask questions," Kenne said.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:39 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Despite An Economy On The Rise, American Paychecks Remain Stuck

Seattle Space Needle elevator operator Michael Hall says despite the success of the attraction, his pay hasn't budged in four years.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 7:21 pm

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

For seven years, Michael Hall has been guiding tourists to the top of Seattle's Space Needle and back. It's a unique vantage point from which to watch the ups and downs of Americans' paychecks.

Read more
Politics
4:56 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

President Obama Meets With Arab Allies At Camp David

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 9:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
It's All Politics
6:56 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

How Do You Say 'Snafu' In Japanese?

When Democratic opposition delayed a major Asia-Pacific trade deal, White House press secretary Josh Earnest was asked if the administration had to do some hand-holding with the 11 countries involved in the talks. "I don't know how 'snafu' translates into a variety of Asian languages," he said.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:02 pm

The Senate looks ready to move ahead with trade legislation, after a daylong delay that the Obama administration repeatedly described as a "snafu."

"These kinds of procedural snafus are not uncommon," said White House spokesman Josh Earnest after Democrats held up the bill, which would give President Obama authority to expedite passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Read more
It's All Politics
7:22 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Obama: We Must 'Guard Against Cynicism' When It Comes To Poverty

President Obama spoke at the Catholic-Evangelical Leadership Summit on Overcoming Poverty at Georgetown University Tuesday.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:31 pm

President Obama says overcoming poverty requires both strong families and a strong economy.

Speaking at Georgetown University Tuesday, Obama said that political debates over poverty often get hung up over the role of government, families and religious institutions.

"I think it's important when it comes to dealing with issues of poverty for us to guard against cynicism and not buy the idea that the poor will always be with us, and there's nothing we can do," Obama said. "Because there's a lot we can do."

Read more
It's All Politics
2:52 pm
Fri May 8, 2015

Would Lower Shoe Tariffs Actually Encourage American Jobs?

President Obama spoke at Nike headquarters in Beaverton, Ore., on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 3:31 pm

The Nike Corp. says the lower tariffs promised by a proposed Asia-Pacific trade deal would allow it to speed up development of advanced manufacturing, supporting up to 10,000 domestic jobs over the next decade.

The announcement comes as President Obama visits Nike headquarters to promote the trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP. Critics have questioned the Beaverton, Ore., backdrop, noting that Nike currently manufactures virtually all of its shoes and apparel in low-wage countries such as Vietnam.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:31 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Obama Laces Up To Tout Asian Trade Deal At Nike

President Obama walks away from Marine One in his Nikes on Sunday. He heads to Nike Headquarters later this week.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 1:47 pm

President Obama says he wants consumers around the world buying more products stamped, "Made in the U.S.A."

That's one reason he's pushing a controversial Asian trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Obama has chosen a curious setting to make his pitch for the trade agreement this week. He'll be speaking Friday at the Beaverton, Ore., headquarters of the Nike Corporation.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:29 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Just Do It: Obama Tries To Sway Skeptical Democrats On Trade

It's proving difficult for President Obama to win over Democrats on trade so far.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 1, 2015 8:59 am

President Obama met Thursday with moderate Democrats in hopes of rallying support for a controversial Asia-Pacific trade deal.

The president will need approval from at least some members of his own party to win passage of a "fast-track" bill, authorizing him to complete trade negotiations and present the agreement for an up-or-down vote in Congress.

So far, most Democratic lawmakers have been skeptical.

Read more

Pages