Robert Siegel

Robert Siegel is senior host of NPR's award-winning evening newsmagazine All Things Considered. With 40 years of experience working in radio news, Siegel is still at it hosting the country's most-listened-to, afternoon-drive-time news radio program and reporting on stories and happenings all over the globe. As a host, Siegel has reported from a variety of locations across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and Asia.

In 2010, Siegel was recognized by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with the John Chancellor Award. Siegel has been honored with three Silver Batons from Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University, first in 1984 for All Things Considered's coverage of peace movements in East and West Germany. He shared in NPR's 1996 Silver Baton Award for "The Changing of the Guard: The Republican Revolution," for coverage of the first 100 days of the 104th Congress. He was part of the NPR team that won a Silver Baton for the network's coverage of the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

Other awards Siegel has earned include a 1997 American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award for the two-part documentary, "Murder, Punishment, and Parole in Alabama" and the National Mental Health Association's 1991 Mental Health Award for his interviews conducted on the streets of New York in an All Things Considered story, "The Mentally Ill Homeless."

Siegel joined NPR in December 1976 as a newscaster and became an editor the following year. In 1979, Siegel became NPR's first staffer based overseas when he was chosen to open NPR's London bureau, where he worked as senior editor until 1983. After London, Siegel served for four years as director of the News and Information Department, overseeing production of NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition, as well as special events and other news programming. During his tenure, NPR launched its popular Saturday and Sunday newsmagazine Weekend Edition.

Before coming to NPR, Siegel worked for WRVR Radio in New York City as a reporter, host and news director. He was part of the WRVR team honored with an Armstrong Award for the series, "Rockefeller's Drug Law." Prior to WRVR, he was morning news reporter and telephone talk show host for WGLI Radio in Babylon, New York.

A graduate of New York's Stuyvesant High School and Columbia University, Siegel began his career in radio at Columbia's radio station, WKCR-FM. As a student he anchored coverage of the 1968 Columbia demonstrations and contributed to the work that earned the station an award from the Writers Guild of America East.

Siegel is the editor of The NPR Interviews 1994, The NPR Interviews 1995 and The NPR Interviews 1996, compilations of NPR's most popular radio conversations from each year.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: This week, our colleague Robert Siegel has been talking with voters in the swing state of Ohio. Today, a visit to Youngstown, a former steel city near the Pennsylvania state line. Youngstown has long been Democratic, but as Robert tells us, it has taken to Donald Trump with a passion and with memories of a local political hero who foreshadowed much of Trump's message. ROBERT SIEGEL, BYLINE: This is do-it-yourself...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Ohio is considered a must-win state for Donald Trump. That's why our colleague Robert Siegel is there this week talking with Republicans. He's brought us the voices of working-class voters inspired by Trump's campaign and establishment Republicans who are turned off by it. Now Robert checks in with some young Republicans. ROBERT SIEGEL, BYLINE: If you're 20 years old, the country went to war when you were 5, and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Earlier this week, Ohio's Republican governor, John Kasich, cast his vote for president. He wrote in John McCain. That's just one indication of how this election is not quite like any other. Our colleague Robert Siegel is in Ohio this week to hear about the impact Donald Trump is having on the state's Republicans. Yesterday he brought us the voices of enthusiastic Trump voters, grassroots supporters who are more...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Our co-host Robert Siegel is in the swing state of Ohio this week. No Republican president has ever been elected without winning that state. Some traditional Republicans - the state's governor, John Kasich, for one - have resisted Donald Trump's novel take on Republican politics this year. But as Robert is hearing among some Ohio voters, the enthusiasm for Trump is intense. ROBERT SIEGEL, BYLINE: There's much talk...

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Throughout the last academic year, we've followed a group of students who graduated from high school a few years ago in Montgomery County, Md., just outside Washington, D.C. We spent the last year talking with them about their choice of public, private or community college. Was the cost worth it? What is the value of higher education? It turns out they're all satisfied customers. And among the most important subjects they report learning a lot about was themselves. Reconciling their plans and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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