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Parallels
6:42 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Investigation Underway Into Killing Of Cecil, Zimbabwe's Best Known Lion

Cecil the lion is shown walking in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park in a YouTube video from July 9, 2015. Credit: Bryan Orford
Bryan Orford YouTube

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 3:12 pm

Conservationists are lamenting the hunting and killing of a well-known lion from western Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park.

The black-maned lion, named Cecil, was 13 years old and had become popular among tourists from around the world.

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The Salt
6:04 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Oceans Called A 'Wild West' Where Lawlessness And Impunity Rule

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 12:19 am

There are about 140 million square miles of open ocean, and according to New York Times reporter Ian Urbina, much of it is essentially lawless. As Mark Young, a retired U.S. Coast Guard commander and former chief of enforcement for the Pacific Ocean, told Urbina, the maritime realm is "like the Wild West. Weak rules, few sheriffs, lots of outlaws."

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All Tech Considered
6:40 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Narcissistic, Maybe. But Is There More To The Art Of The Selfie?

To selfie, or not to selfie?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 11:09 am

The smartphone has given us a whole new genre of cultural expression: the selfie.

If you're into selfies, it's safe to say you've probably taken one, and maybe wished you didn't have those dark circles under your eyes.

Now there are plenty of apps out there to fix that.

But whether you think your selfies can be elevated to art may depend on how much effort you are willing to put into them.

A Personal Brand Boost

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Latin America
6:11 pm
Sun July 26, 2015

A Day Of Triumph In A Time Of Change: Cuba's High Holiday Explained

Cubans gather in Santiago de Cuba to celebrate this year's Revolution Day, the 62nd anniversary of Fidel Castro's first open assault on the forces of President Fulgencio Batista, who would eventually be overthrown by the rebels.
Yamil Lage AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 11:23 pm

On this day 62 years ago, Fidel Castro launched the attack that marked the start of the Cuban revolution. In the years since, the day has taken on emotional significance for the Cuban people — and for the communist government that celebrates it annually.

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Global Health
5:13 pm
Sun July 26, 2015

Transgender Women Face Inadequate Health Care, 'Shocking' HIV Rates

Transgender performers walk backstage during an event to mark World AIDS Day in 2013. A new WHO report demonstrates extremely rates of HIV infection among transgender women in 15 countries.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 11:27 pm

Transgender people are not getting adequate health care, and widespread discrimination is largely to blame, according to a recent World Health Organization report. And the story is told most starkly in the high rates of HIV among transgender women worldwide.

JoAnne Keatley, one of the authors of that study, puts it plainly.

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Author Interviews
5:50 am
Sun July 26, 2015

In This Twist On Tricky Dick's History, A President's Secrets Can Save Us

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 10:38 am

"I promise you I will show the same contempt for the historical record that it has shown for me."

So intone the opening pages of Austin Grossman's Crooked, in what are supposed to be the thoughts of our 37th president, Richard Nixon — or, at least, those thoughts as Grossman imagines them.

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Newport Folk Festival
5:18 pm
Sat July 25, 2015

50 Years Ago, Bob Dylan Electrified A Decade With One Concert

Diana Davies Courtesy of the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 5:28 pm

In the early 1960s, burgeoning folk music scenes were burbling up all over the country, and the Newport Folk Festival was their confluence.

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Movie Interviews
5:15 pm
Sat July 25, 2015

Back To Walley World: The Griswolds Go On 'Vacation' Again

Skyler Gisondo (from left), Steele Stebbins, Christina Applegate and Ed Helms are the new Griswold family — en route to Walley World — in the 2015 follow-up to the 1983 movie Vacation.
Hopper Stone Warner Brothers Pictures

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 5:28 pm

National Lampoon's Vacation has been resurrected: more than 30 years later, the Griswolds are back on another reckless, wild road trip.

In the new movie Vacation, Rusty Griswold, the son from the original series, is all grown up and taking his family on a cross-country trip to the theme park Walley World. It goes about as smoothly as you'd expect.

Co-writers and co-directors John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein say the R-rated movie is not a reboot or a remake, but very much a sequel.

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Race
7:48 am
Sat July 25, 2015

A Navajo Speaker Says The Language Connects Her With Her Culture

Supporters of Navajo presidential candidate Chris Deschene were unhappy last October when a court determined that he did not meet the language requirement.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 10:55 am

Should the president of the Navajo Nation be required to speak fluent Navajo?

The Navajo Nation held a referendum on that question this week, and the majority voted no.

The vote was victory for supporters of a Navajo presidential candidate who was disqualified last fall because he didn't speak the language fluently. The next Navajo Nation election is in 2018.

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Author Interviews
5:35 am
Sat July 25, 2015

In 'Wondering Who You Are,' A Man Wakes Up And Doesn't Know His Wife

Lea and Bandy met in 1976 at a high school dance. "He was the boy from out of town," Lea writes. "I was the girl who wanted out."
John Carswell Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 10:55 am

Sonya Lea and her husband Richard Bandy had a 23-year marriage filled with ups, downs and memories. In 2000 Bandy developed a rare form of appendix cancer and had an operation which was successful — sort of.

Bandy lived, but he was almost a different man. He had suffered a post-surgical complication called "anoxic insult" that cut oxygen to his brain and cleared much of his memory. He called his wife "Sweetness," but could not remember how they met, when they got married and the births of their two children. Twenty-three years more or less vanished from his mind.

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