Andrew Flanagan

Vic Damone, a singer who rose to fame along the tail end of the post-war era embodied by The Rat Pack, died yesterday at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, Fla., according to a statement from his family. He was 89.

A first-generation Italian-American, Damone grew up closely studying the work of another similarly situated artist, Frank Sinatra, who would later become a cherished friend. "Without Frank there would not have been a Vic Damone," Damone once said.

A strained "Star-Spangled Banner," a decaf flat white of a halftime show, an understated show of solidarity and, of course, the advertisements: If nothing else, Super Bowl LII's musical moments were legion. Here are the ones that caught NPR Music's ears over the course of the night.

Pink's lozenge

A story for the "slipped right by us" file: Michael Davenport, a former bassist for turn-of-the-century pop-punk stalwarts The Ataris, was indicted in December by the U.S. Attorney's Office of the Southern District of Illinois of allegedly defrauding an astounding number of people — some 100,000, in every U.S. state (and the District of Columbia) — of $27 million over a period of seven years. Davenport and a co-worker were scheduled to be arraigned in East St. Louis, Ill., on Wednesday.

"Fast" Eddie Clarke, guitarist for the original three-piece formation of Motörhead, died Wednesday evening after a bout with pneumonia, the band's manager Todd Singerman confirmed to NPR. He was 67.

"Fast Eddie was an integral part of the Motörhead family," a statement from Springerman reads, "and I have to say I was shocked and saddened when word reached me last night that he had passed. Eddie was the last of the Three Amigos (as that classic line-up was called) still walking, but now the trio are reunited."

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