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5:47 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

For Some Donors, Boy Scouts' Ban On Gays Doesn't Add Up

Eagle Scout Zach Wahls delivers cartons of petitions to the Boys Scouts of America national board meeting in Orlando, Fla., last May, calling for an end to anti-gay discriminatory practices. Helping to carry the cartons are Mark Anthony Dingbaum and Christine Irvine of Change.org.
Barbara Liston Reuters/Landov

Years of criticism and even a U.S. Supreme Court challenge couldn't force the Boy Scouts of America to admit openly gay members and leaders. But money talks, and after the defections of major donors, the 103-year-old organization is poised to lift its national ban.

Just last summer, the Boy Scouts reaffirmed the ban after a lengthy internal review. Several incidents since then have tarnished the organization's image and fueled an aggressive nationwide protest led by an Eagle Scout.

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The Salt
5:45 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Carrot Juice Instead of Coke? USDA Proposes New School Snack Rules

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposed new rules for school snacks promote healthier options, like the fruits and vegetables served in this Palo Alto, Calif., cafeteria.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 10:24 am

The Department of Agriculture has proposed a new "Smart Snacks in School" rule that aims to promote more healthful options in school vending machines, snack bars and cafeterias across the country.

The USDA's updated regulations, which are open to public comment for 60 days, will set nutrition standards and calorie limits for snack foods that are sold in schools.

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It's All Politics
5:43 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Why Steven Chu Was One Of Obama's Most Intriguing Choices

Energy Secretary Steven Chu tours the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Waynesboro, Ga., last year.
David Goldman AP

Of all the individuals in President Obama's first-term Cabinet, physicist Steven Chu was arguably the least likely to be found in official Washington.

The Energy Department secretary, after all, was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist from the University of California, Berkeley, the first science laureate to serve as a Cabinet secretary.

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Live in Concert
5:37 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Carnegie Hall Live: Daniel Barenboim Leads The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Daniel Barenboim conducts the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in Beethoven's Symphony No. 2 live at Carnegie Hall on February 3, 2013.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 10:02 am

Performers:

  • West-Eastern Divan Orchestra
  • Daniel Barenboim, music director and conductor
  • Diana Damrau, soprano
  • Kate Lindsey, mezzo-soprano
  • Piotr Beczala, tenor
  • René Pape, bass
  • Westminster Symphonic Choir
  • Joe Miller, Conductor
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Deceptive Cadence
5:34 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Treasures In The Attic: Finding A Jazz Master's Lost Orchestral Music

Stride piano pioneer James P. Johnson had dreams of becoming a successful symphonic composer.
William Gottlieb

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 5:13 pm

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The Two-Way
5:30 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Questions Arise About Veracity Of Iranian Space Monkey

The monkey Iranian authorities said was sent to space.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 6:21 pm

Earlier this week, we told you that Iran was claiming a "major achievement." State media reported the country had sent a monkey into space.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Reports: Secret Service Director Will Retire After 30 Years Of Service

Mark Sullivan, Director of the United States Secret Service, at a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee in May of 2012.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan will retire after 30 years in service, The Associated Press and other news outlets are reporting.

Sullivan is retiring after a tough year for the agency. If you remember, 11 of its agents were involved in a prostitution scandal in Colombia.

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Shots - Health News
4:44 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Novartis Recalls Triaminic And Theraflu Cough Syrups

Triaminic syrups and Theraflu Warming Relief syrups have been recalled by manufacturer Novartis.
Courtesy of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

The Consumer Products Safety Commission says that "child-resistant" caps on some bottles of cough and flu syrup aren't as sturdy as advertised.

That's a problem, because products implicated in the agency's latest recall announcement — Triaminic and Theraflu syrups and "warming liquids" — contain acetaminophen and diphenhydramine.

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World Cafe
4:38 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Beach House On World Cafe

Beach House.
Liz Flyntz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 3:05 pm

Sitting down with Beach House is a bit like listening to the band's music. No matter how many times we feature Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally, they impress with their relaxed complexity and refreshing insight into how music can work.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Dow Breaks 14,000 For First Time Since 2007

Trader Frederick Reimer works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 4:32 pm

Happy days are (or might be) here again: The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 14,000 Friday, marking the first time the stock market measure has broken that barrier at close since October 2007.

The average closed at 14,009.79. That's up more than 149 points, or about 1.1 percent for the day. The closing comes hours after the release of a new monthly unemployment report that indicated jobs grew at a faster rate late last year than previously estimated.

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