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Remembrances
10:19 am
Sun October 21, 2012

McGovern Legacy Offers More Than A Lost Presidency

McGovern listens to a constituent in 1974.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

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Remembrances
8:06 am
Sun October 21, 2012

McGovern's Candidacy Inspired New Wave Of Voters

Former Sen. George McGovern (D-S.C.) accepts the Democratic nomination for president at the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach, Fla.
AP

Former Sen. George McGovern, the liberal senator from conservative South Dakota, died on Sunday. He was 90 years old.

McGovern lost the 1972 presidential race to Richard Nixon by a landslide, carrying only Massachusetts. But his candidacy and opposition to the Vietnam War were embraced by a new generation of voters.

The defining moments in McGovern's life included not only winning the Democratic nomination for president in 1972, and not just the dismal loss to Nixon that followed, but also safely landing an airplane that the German army had tried to blow out of the sky.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Sun October 21, 2012

AP: Sen. George McGovern Dies

Former presidential nominee and Sen. George McGovern.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 8:08 am

Sen. George McGovern, who lost the 1972 presidential bid to Richard Nixon yet inspired a new generation of voters, has died. He was 90.

A family spokesman told the AP that McGovern died at 5:15 a.m. Sunday at a hospice in Sioux Falls, S.D., surrounded by family and friends.

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Movie Interviews
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

In McElwee Doc, 'Memory' Fails And Family Clashes

In an attempt to remember what it was like to have most of his life ahead of him, filmmaker Ross McElwee turns the camera on his son, Adrian, seen above.
Fred Wasser

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 7:04 am

Filmmaker Ross McElwee is a one-man crew: soundman, cameraman, narrator. He reached a wide audience with his sweet documentary Sherman's March, which chronicled his journey through the South searching for love. The film won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 1987. He's made five documentary features since then.

McElwee's latest film is Photographic Memory — and it presents a different side of the director.

Early in Photographic Memory, we see McElwee in a small town in Brittany, France, in a state of digital disorientation.

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Music Interviews
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

From Elgar To Beatles: Abbey Road Blazed A Trail

The iconic cover of The Beatles' Abbey Road.
Album cover

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 12:01 pm

In 1969, four moppy-haired musicians named John, Paul, George and Ringo walked single file on a London crosswalk and made one of the most iconic album covers of all time. Today, a steady stream of Beatles fans and London tourists are still eager to walk in the footsteps of the Fab Four on that famous stretch of asphalt.

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Theater
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

A Celebration Of Janis Joplin And All Her Swagger

Mary Bridget Davies as Janis Joplin and Sabrina Elayne Carten as Blues Singer in the Cleveland Play House production of One Night with Janis Joplin.
Janet Macoska Arena Stage

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

The countercultural revolution of the 1960s may have been all about sex drugs and rock 'n' roll, but for one young Texas singer it was all about the blues. No one sang the blues quite like Janis Joplin.

Joplin was part of a legendary line-up of musicians at Woodstock in 1969: Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead, Joan Baez. She wasn't on the music scene long, though. Joplin died in 1970 of a drug overdose. She was only 27 years old, but in that short time her bluesy rasp helped define the music of a generation.

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It's All Politics
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Obama, Romney On Track To Spend $1B By Election Day

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 6:30 pm

The latest filing deadline for fundraising reports in the presidential campaigns was Saturday night, and the totals are staggering.

President Obama and the Democratic Party's grand total is just north of $900 million dollars for the current cycle, while Mitt Romney and the Republicans topped $800 million. Both sides are on track to raise and spend $1 billion by Election Day.

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Presidential Race
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Turns Out, There Are Rules For The Debates. Lots

The candidates agreed to 21 pages of debate rules, but whether they obey them is another story.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

When President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney meet for their third presidential debate on Monday, there will be some rules for the candidates — and the audience.

In the first debate, Jim Lehrer of PBS demanded "Absolute silence!" Although Lehrer caught some flack for letting the candidates freewheel in that debate, he meant business when it came to keeping the audience quiet.

"If you hear something that's really terrific, sit on it!" he told the audience. "If you hear something you don't like, sit on it!"

But that's not the only debate rule — not by far.

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The Salt
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Despite Protest, College Plans To Slaughter, Serve Farm's Beloved Oxen

After a leg injury didn't heal well earlier this year, Lou has difficulty walking. He and his partner, Bill, will be slaughtered at the end of the month, and their meat will be used to feed students at Green Mountain College in Vermont.
Nina Keck Vermont Public Radio

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

If the thought of eating horse meat makes you queasy, what about strong, sturdy oxen? A small Vermont college that emphasizes sustainable living will soon slaughter two beloved campus residents: Bill and Lou, a pair of oxen. Green Mountain College plans to serve the meat from the oxen in its dining hall, but the plan has drawn international outcry and a massive Facebook petition to save the oxen.

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It's All Politics
6:23 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Libya Has Become The Flash Point Of Foreign Policy Debate

An empty bullet shell in the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 13, after the attack on the building late on Sept. 11, in which the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans were killed.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 12:24 pm

In the end, it's an argument about competence.

The Obama administration's response to the Sept. 11 killings at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, has become a staple of the campaign. It's bound to come up again during Monday's debate about foreign policy.

Mitt Romney will use the event — which left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens — to question President Obama's veracity and his handling of foreign policy in general.

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