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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

On Court Order, Boy Scouts' Confidential 'Perversion Files' Go Public

A Boy Scout salutes traffic as he stands next to a flag display on a freeway overpass September 11, 2008 in Lafayette, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 6:29 pm

On orders from the Oregon Supreme Court, more than 1,200 confidential files the Boy Scouts of America kept on suspected child molesters from the 1960s through 1985 have been made public.

Commonly referred to as the organization's "perversion files," they give the public a first and intimate look at how the Boy Scouts handled allegations of sexual abuse. In some cases, they show how some volunteers were booted from the organization, then snuck back in, only to be kicked out again when parents or scouts made allegations of sexual abuse.

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Mountain Stage
2:41 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Guy Clark On Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 10:36 am

Guy Clark was born in Texas and moved to California as a young man before relocating to Nashville in 1971. He stepped into the spotlight in the early '70s with songs like "L.A. Freeway" and "Desperados Waiting for a Train," both recorded by Jerry Jeff Walker.

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The Record
2:41 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

For The Ladies: R. Kelly, Teddy Pendergrass And The State Of R&B

R. Kelly's "Single Ladies" tour, which includes a "Ladies Only" section, began this week and runs into December.
Randee St. Nicholas RCA Records

Originally published on Sat October 20, 2012 3:49 pm

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Second Federal Court Strikes Down Defense Of Marriage Act

Edith Windsor, whose case led to an appeals court striking down the Defense of Marriage Act.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 5:57 pm

The Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional because it discriminates against same-sex couples, a second federal appeals court has ruled.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that it took the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York less than a month to come to its decision. As he tells our Newscast Desk:

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All Songs Considered
2:38 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

CMJ 2012: Discoveries Day Two

Drummer Zach Hill of Sacramento-based band Death Grips, during the group's speaker-busting set at (Le) Poisson Rouge.
Loren Wohl for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:54 pm

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Book Reviews
2:34 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

'Master' Jefferson: Defender Of Liberty, Then Slavery

Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 2:59 pm

His public words have inspired millions, but for scholars, his private words and deeds generate confusion, discomfort, apologetic excuses. When the young Thomas Jefferson wrote, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal," there's compelling evidence to indicate that he indeed meant all men, not just white guys.

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Around the Nation
2:32 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

No Roof Rookies Here: Cleaning The Superdome

Rene Lopez and Devin Burrell blast dirt off the polyurethane coating the iconic white roof of the Superdome in New Orleans. The job will cost about $130,000 and take roughly a month, partly because the roofers must move slowly. "You have to constantly be aware of where you're at," says project manager Tom Keller. "If something stupid happens, it's not going to end up pretty."
Keith O'Brien for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:42 am

Most people have their route to work memorized; they can do it with their eyes closed. Heading into the office is some combination of elevators — stairs if you're more ambitious — and hallways. Easy.

Tom Keller's route is a bit more complicated.

"Step here, and there's a bad railing right here with a step," Keller cautions, threading his way up along a series of dimly lit, narrow catwalks suspended above the football field inside the New Orleans Superdome.

The stadium is home to the New Orleans Saints and will host this year's Super Bowl.

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World
2:29 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Radio Liberty Going Off The Air In Russia

Police officers detain Kirill Filimonov, one of the supporters of Radio Liberty in Moscow during a recent protest. The service will stop AM radio broadcasts and will become an Internet operation. It can also be heard on short wave radio.
Natalia Kolesnikova AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 5:42 am

Radio Liberty was founded in the 1950s to broadcast American views into the former Soviet Union when the Cold War was at its peak. Radio Liberty transmitted on short wave, and the Soviet government did all it could to jam the broadcasts.

But after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russian President Boris Yeltsin granted the service permission to open a Moscow bureau and broadcast within the country on AM radio.

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Monkey See
2:10 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

MTV's 'Underemployed': Heavy On Stereotypes, Still Light On Realistic Apartments

Diego Boneta, Sarah Habel, Michelle Ang, Inbar Lavi and Jared Kusnitz of MTV's Underemployed.
MTV

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:54 pm

"It was the best of times, it was the best of times," riffs aspiring writer Sophia in the opening of MTV's new dramedy, Underemployed, as she taps away on her laptop, narrating the lives of her recent-grad friends a la Carrie Bradshaw. It's the first cliché in a series full of them. It's also a sign of the ongoing fascination with the lives of twentysomethings trying and failing to do big things in big cities during a big recession. (Take it from me — it's not that great.)

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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Google's Stock Drops After Premature Release; 'PendingLarry' Goes Viral

Google CEO Larry Page. What's he going to say now?
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 3:05 pm

Oops.

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