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Book Reviews
7:23 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Spooky Puppets, Slow Pacing In 'Catechism'

Courtesy of St. Martin's Press

Mike Mignola's occult adventure comics B.P.R.D. (that's short for Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense) and Hellboy (about a demon who fights for the side of Good) combine furious action set pieces on a literally biblical scale with a wry and nuanced understanding of very human emotions. The novelist Christopher Golden has written many popular works of dark fantasy.

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It's All Politics
7:10 am
Wed October 31, 2012

There's No Contingency Plan If Disaster Strikes On Election Day

A crowd listens at a rally with former President Bill Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden in Youngstown, Ohio, on Monday. President Obama canceled his appearance to return to the White House to monitor Hurricane Sandy. Both campaigns have urged supporters whose states allow early voting to vote as soon as possible.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 1:36 pm

Suppose Sandy had struck a week later. With power out across multiple states, how would people be able to vote on Election Day?

"If this were happening next week, we have no provisions for dealing with this in law," says Thad Hall, a political scientist at the University of Utah.

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Around the Nation
6:47 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Stranded In Hawaii By Sandy, Travelers Wait

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Hurricane Sandy disrupted flights all across the United States. Even people far from the storm discovered planes could not get to their airports. And of all the people affected, the saddest were surely 1,300 people from the East Coast stuck in Honolulu.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

What a shame.

Games & Humor
6:45 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Zombie Pumpkin Carving Gives Viewers The Shivers

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of jack-o-lantern art this Halloween. Ray Villafane is a former teacher who found his medium after carving a gourd a student gave him. The sculptor began with a pumpkin, this year, weighing just under a ton to create a vividly realistic life-sized, stringy-haired orange zombie pulling other zombies out of a pumpkin garden. The work of pumpkin art is now giving people the shivers at the New York Botanical Garden. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Election 2012
5:21 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Scrutinizing The Candidates' Stump Speeches

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

During this disaster, President Obama and Governor Romney paused their campaigns, but there's still plenty of time before Election Day for another round of stump speeches - those partisan speeches for partisan crowds who don't give them a lot of scrutiny. So we decided to show the speeches to people who would be more critical - political operatives from the opposite party.

In this first of two parts, NPR's Tamara Keith brings us a look at a recent stump speech from President Obama.

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Election 2012
5:21 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Sandy Likely To Have An Impact On Election Day

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Officials from President Obama on down warn that the destruction caused by Sandy will take a long while to clean up. Election Day is less than a week away, and in some places where the storm struck, it's likely to have an impact on turnout and, conceivably, the outcome.

All Tech Considered
4:26 am
Wed October 31, 2012

The Night A Computer Predicted The Next President

Walter Cronkite (right) listens as Dr. J. Presper Eckert (center) describes the functions of the UNIVAC I computer he helped develop in the early 1950s.
AP

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:55 am

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Religion
4:26 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Shift In Mormon Age Policy Widens Women's Options

A statue representing womanhood — and women's role in raising children — is seen with the Mormon Temple in the background in Salt Lake City.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 11:40 am

Hannon Young was listening with only half an ear during the General Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints earlier this month when Church President Thomas S. Monson started talking about missionaries. But then Young perked up — and froze, as Monson declared that women no longer have to wait until they are 21 to go on their missions. They can begin at 19, he said.

"You could hear an audible gasp throughout the whole conference center," says Young, a freshman at Brigham Young University. "It was just this wave of shock."

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Election 2012
4:25 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Sandy Underscores Debate Over Government's Role

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 1:09 pm

President Obama offered thoughts and prayers Tuesday for all those who have been affected by Sandy. He also offered something more tangible: the full resources of the federal government.

"The most important message I have for them is that America's with you," he said. "We are standing behind you, and we are going to do everything we can to help you get back on your feet."

For Obama, the federal government is a critical vehicle for that kind of help. Republicans put more faith in local government, and even voluntary efforts.

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Law
4:25 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Can Drug-Sniffing Dog Prompt Home Search?

Miami-Dade narcotics detector canine Franky, who came out of retirement to give a demonstration, sniffs marijuana in Miami in 2011. Franky's supersensitive nose is at the heart of a question being put to the U.S. Supreme Court: Does a police K-9's sniff outside a house give officers the right to get a search warrant for illegal drugs?
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

You can already hear all the likely jokes at the Supreme Court, about the justices going to the dogs. But the issue being argued Wednesday is deadly serious: whether police can take a trained drug-detection dog up to a house to smell for drugs inside, and if the dog alerts, use that to justify a search of the home.

In the case before the court, the four-legged cop was named Franky, and as a result of his nose, his human police partner charged Joelis Jardines with trafficking in more than 25 pounds of marijuana.

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