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Business
7:48 am
Wed March 6, 2013

E.U. Hits Microsoft With $732 Million Fine

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR business news starts with a big fine for Microsoft.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

The Two-Way
7:32 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Book News: 'Superman' Artist Quits Amid Uproar Over Author's Views On Homosexuality

Orson Scott Card, the Ender's Game author tapped to work on an upcoming issue of DC Comics' "Adventures of Superman," has referred to homosexuality as "deviant behavior."
Mark Dadswell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 7:38 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Africa
7:25 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Hot Coffee Thwarts Robbery Attempt

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 3:18 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. This story starts as a business transaction in West Haven, Connecticut. A man ordered coffee at a drive-thru Dunkin Donuts. Then, according to NBC Connecticut, he announced a robbery and tried to climb through the window. Luckily, his hot coffee was ready so the clerk threw it in his face. She followed that with a whole pot. The man fled and the clerk recalled the Dunkin Donuts slogan: Go run on Dunkin, she called after him. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
7:21 am
Wed March 6, 2013

In China, Baby's Brutal Death Raises Questions For Many About Nation's Values

Baby Haobo. For many netizens in China, this pixelated image of the infant who suffered a grisly death is a stark reminder of disturbing changes in the country's values system. The picture has spread quickly across Chinese websites.
Tencent

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 1:08 pm

A tale of two car thefts has transfixed China, sparking a new bout of soul-searching. It's generated far more attention online than the ongoing legislative session in Beijing, despite leaked orders from the local government restricting official coverage.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed March 6, 2013

No Ordinary 'Acrobat': An Unconventional History Of The Circus

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 9:05 am

Whenever I think of the circus (which, admittedly, is rarely), the first thing that comes to mind is Bruce Davidson's famous photograph of a forlorn clown smoking a cigarette and clutching a fistful of wilted flowers in the mud outside a ratty circus tent. Fittingly, I first saw this striking image on the cover of Heinrich Boll's 1963 novel, The Clown. The titular protagonist isn't the creepy backyard children's entertainer we've come to associate with the form. He's troubled and high-strung, and sees himself first and foremost as an artist — and something of a mystic, to boot.

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Europe
6:41 am
Wed March 6, 2013

German Man Caught Impersonating A Cardinal

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

The world is speculating, furiously, about who will be the next pope. The wait was too much for one German man, who tried to sneak into a closed-door meeting of cardinals by impersonating one. The man, calling himself Basilius was spotted and thrown out by the Swiss Guard, after someone noticed his crucifix was too short and his sash was just a purple scarf. He claimed to be from the Italian Orthodox Church - which does not exist.

Book Reviews
6:28 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Second-Person Narrator Tells Readers 'How To' Live, Love — And Get Filthy Rich

Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:08 am

This is not the first time Pakistani author Mohsin Hamid has taken a risky approach to a novel. His The Reluctant Fundamentalist was written entirely in the second person. The bearded narrator of that book sits at a tea stall in Lahore, talking about his drift toward extremism while directly addressing "you," the reader, who is taken to be an increasingly jumpy and terrified American across the table.

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Latin America
4:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Chavez's Death Will Have Ramifications For Cuba

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The death of Hugo Chavez could mean as much for Cuba as it will for Venezuela. As we just heard, Chavez looked to Fidel Castro for inspiration, and Castro has supplied Venezuela with thousands of Cuban doctors, health workers and security specialists. In return, Chavez sent a massive amount of Venezuelan oil to Cuba at cut-rate prices, and thus helped keep the Cuban economy afloat during years of crisis.

Joining us now is NPR's Tom Gjelten. Good morning.

TOM GJELTEN, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Business
4:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR business news starts with markets on fire.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Around the Nation
4:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Chicago Commuters Brace For Delays During Bridge Repair

Construction on Chicago's Wells Street Bridge is taking place around the clock, as crews replace the south leaf section. The north leaf section will be replaced in the spring. The double-decked steel truss drawbridge was built in 1922.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

A major artery that feeds Chicago's downtown business district has been temporarily cut off as crews work around the clock this week to replace half of the 91-year-old Wells Street drawbridge.

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