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5:16 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Pastor, Mentor And Social Activist: Remembering Gordon Cosby

The Rev. Gordon Cosby died March 20 at 95.
Courtesy of Church of the Saviour

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 5:25 pm

When the Rev. Gordon Cosby founded Church of the Saviour in the late 1940s, it was one of the first interracial churches in the still-segregated District of Columbia. Cosby, who died last month at the age of 95, is remembered not only for his work as a pastor, but also for his commitment to social change.

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Author Interviews
5:00 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

A Pilgrimage Through France, Though Not For God

Tourists visit Bugarath, a small village in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, on Dec. 20, 2012.
Patrick Aventurier Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 6:05 pm

For centuries, pilgrims have made their way along the El Camino de Santiago de Compostela, or St. James' Way. It's an ancient route honoring St. James of Compostela and can take a traveler on foot for hundreds of miles to what is believed to be the apostle's burial site in northwestern Spain.

American travel writer David Downie and his wife, Alison, decided to begin their trek from their longtime home in Paris. For Downie, this wasn't necessarily a religious pilgrimage. He stresses he wasn't looking for God, though maybe enlightenment.

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Music Interviews
4:57 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Nick Drake's Producer Remembers 'A Real Musician's Musician'

The cover photo from Nick Drake's 1969 debut, Five Leaves Left, produced by Joe Boyd.
Album cover

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:33 pm

English folk musician Nick Drake died decades before the song "Pink Moon" found him a wide audience, thanks to a series of Volkswagen ads back in 1999. They sparked a resurgence of interest in Drake's work — music largely ignored in his day but now inspiring legions of young musicians.

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World
4:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

As Arctic Ice Melts, It's A Free-For-All For Oil ... And Tusks

After being frozen for thousands of years in a Siberian riverbed, this pristine mammoth tusk is a financial boon to the hunter who found it.
Evgenia Arbugaeva National Geographic Magazine

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 11:47 am

It's widely known that the world's icecaps are melting. While most people are focused on what we're losing, some have considered what might be gained by the disappearance of all that ice.

In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey released a report estimating that 13 percent of the world's remaining undiscovered oil and 30 percent of the remaining undiscovered natural gas could be in the Arctic.

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NPR Story
4:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Is Immigration Overhaul On America's Doorstep?

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, the death of a man who could be the most influential pastor you've never heard of. But first, in Spanish, the words el camino means the road, but it can also mean the way. El camino rios, the way to the river. El camino de dias, a religious path.

And for millions, certainly the path to immigration overhaul in the U.S. has been elusive and full of fervor. Witness a rally this past week at the Capitol.

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NPR Story
4:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Street Artists Protest Status Quo In Haiti

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In Haiti, a group of artists is making a name for themselves by creating huge metal sculptures and showing them on the streets. They call themselves Haiti's Resistance Artists, and their work speaks to the devastation following the 2010 earthquake and the stark separation between the country's rich and poor. Reese Erlich has their story.

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Politics
4:01 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

A Brief History Of Secret Recordings

Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky is the latest victim in what has become a tradition in American politics.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:57 am

Secret recordings are becoming a tradition in American politics.

Like buttons, bunting and backslapping at barbecues, surreptitious audio and/or video surprises continue to pop up in political settings — with more and more frequency.

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Beer Bust: Yankees Rename 'Craft Beer' Stand At Stadium

The New York Yankees' "Craft Beer Destination" met with derision online, after fans noted the beers were all MillerCoors products — and one of them is a cider. The stand now has a new title, the "Beer Mixology Destination."
Amanda Rykoff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 3:39 pm

The baseball season is still young, but the New York Yankees have already faced harsh public criticism. No, we're not referring to their lackluster record. Instead, the Yanks were accused of trying to hoodwink beer drinkers with a new "Craft Beer Destination" concession stand at their Bronx stadium.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Violence Hits Guantanamo Bay As Inmates Continue Hunger Strike

A view of the the U.S. Naval Station base in Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Guards and prisoners fought Saturday, as inmates were moved into individual cells instead of communal housing.
Suzette Laboy AP

Inmates fought guards at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after military authorities decided to end communal housing in one of the prison's camps, and instead put prisoners in individual cells. At least one detainee was reportedly injured by a rubber bullet in the clash Saturday.

The violence began after the facility's commander ordered the move Saturday morning. According to the U.S. Southern Command, the decision was made after detainees covered windows and surveillance cameras, limiting guards' ability to monitor them at all times.

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The Salt
12:03 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Junior League Cookbooks: Crowdsourced Recipes, Old-School Style

"Tea-Time at the Masters" is a popular Junior League of Augusta cookbook first published in 1977. It's now in its 17th reprint.
Courtesy of The Association of Junior Leagues International

The Masters Tournament — you think golf, we think food.

Well, now we think food because this week we were tipped off to a cookbook created for the storied tournament in Augusta, Ga.

The Junior League of Augusta, a women's volunteer and civic organization, published Tea-Time at the Masters back in 1977, but it's still in print.

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