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Author Interviews
2:04 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Zoobiquity': What Humans Can Learn From Animal Illness

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:05 am

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, a cardiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, coined the term "zoobiquity" to describe the idea of looking to animals and the doctors who care for them to better understand human health. Veterinary medicine had not been on her radar at all until about 10 years ago. That's when she was asked to join the medical advisory board for the Los Angeles Zoo and she began hearing about "congestive heart failure in a gorilla or leukemia in a rhinoceros or breast cancer in a tiger or a lion."

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Planet Money
1:57 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Why Amazon Supports An Online Sales-Tax Bill

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:10 pm

If you:

1. Live in a state that charges sales tax

and

2. Buy something from an online store that does not charge you sales tax,

then you are supposed to:

3. Calculate the sales tax yourself and add it onto your annual state tax bill.

Not surprisingly, as we reported last week, almost no one actually does this.

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Live in Concert
1:50 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Iggy & The Stooges, Live In Concert

Iggy & The Stooges live from (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York City.
Ryan Muir for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 5:07 pm

If your idea of fun is having a leathery, shirtless, 66-year-old man sweat on you, then you needed to be near the stage at (Le) Poisson Rouge for Iggy Pop's afternoon public-radio showcase on April 28 with his band The Stooges.

And if that's not your idea of fun, then you really, really need to see Iggy Pop perform live, and soon.

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Code Switch
1:41 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Can You Say 'KDAY' In Mandarin?

Dr. Dre (right), and Snoop Dogg (left), perform on Broadway in Times Square, New York City as part of MTV's Spankin New Music Week.
Scott Gries Getty Images/Image Direct

I'm going to out myself. I listen to the "oldies" station on my daily commute to and from NPR West in my banged-up ride, tailpipe barely hanging on. The station's tag-line is "back in the day hits," and my favorite feature is inappropriate relationship advice from a Mexican drag queen who goes by Kay Sedia (as in, quesadilla). The station's call letters are KDAY and it cuts in and out during my commute because its FM signal is weak.

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It's All Politics
1:33 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Managing Tragedy': A Defining Moment For Civic Leaders

Mayor Thomas Menino, who is recovering from a broken leg unrelated to the bombing, watches on as President Obama speaks during an interfaith healing service last week following the Boston Marathon blasts.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:24 pm

Some people are born to be pastors or therapists, but no one goes into politics expecting to help people with grief.

Yet mayors and governors often find themselves having to cope with tragedy. A tornado. A bombing. The death of a police officer, or a little girl.

It becomes an essential part of the job more often than they might expect. While they're rarely prepared for it, how they respond will define their time in office perhaps more than any other act.

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World Cafe
1:27 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

How The Energy-Guzzling Rock Tour Can Go Green

Guster.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:13 pm

While on tour with his band Guster, Adam Gardner noticed that a lot of energy was being consumed, particularly in getting bands and fans together for a show. His wife, an ecologist, had been nudging him at home to become more green, and he'd started to wonder what could be done about the environmental impact of life on the road.

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Monkey See
1:17 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Agony, Ecstasy, Irony: The Fight For The Soul Of College A Cappella

The Nor'easters, of Northeastern University, perform at the International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella on Saturday night.
Joe Martinez

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 1:25 pm

Saturday night at Town Hall in New York, the Nor'easters of Northeastern University in Boston were crowned national champions at the International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA), the entirely real battle dramatized in last summer's surprise hit Pitch Perfect.

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All Songs Considered
1:16 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

What Are Your Top Five Album Covers?

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 8:24 pm

This past week we lost one of the greatest album cover art designers of all time. Britain's Storm Thorgerson, who died last Thursday, was just 69 years old. He'd spent more than 40 years designing and orchestrating some of the most iconic album covers of all time. Even if you don't know the name Storm Thorgerson, you know his work. That prism on the cover of Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon? That was his.

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Latin America
1:03 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

In Gritty Sao Paulo, Artists Take To The Streets

A portrait is projected on the walls of a building as part of a project promoting art through re-evaluating urban spaces and buildings in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Nov. 22.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:52 pm

It's lunchtime in the heart of Sao Paulo's financial district. Surrounded by tall buildings of cool glass and steel, men and women in suits and business attire walk back and forth busily in Brazil's largest city.

Standing amid the bustle is Leticia Matos — who is, for want of a better word, a crochet artist. She couldn't look more different from the people around her.

Wearing a short-sleeve shirt and covered in bright, quirky tattoos, Matos is at work, too. About a year ago, she says, she got the idea for her project while knitting and crocheting with her friends.

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Television
1:02 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

'Rectify': An Ex-Con Navigates The World Outside

Daniel (Aden Young) finds a supporter in the devout Tawney (Adelaide Clemens) — if not among all of his other neighbors — when he's exonerated after spending more than 19 years in prison for a crime he did't commit.
Sundance Film Channel

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:05 am

Rectify, a new drama series from the Sundance Channel, wants to stand out from the pack — and it certainly succeeds at that. It's a six-hour limited series, more along the British model of TV than ours here in the States. If these first six installments catch on enough, the story will continue. If not, that's it.

And Rectify is so unusual a show, with its own deliberate pace and premise and approach, that it may not build enough viewership to keep going. But that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile show, or a memorable one — because it is.

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