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Music Interviews
6:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Xenia Rubinos: Adventures In Syncopation

Xenia Rubinos' debut album is titled Magic Trix.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 9:16 pm

Brooklyn-based keyboardist and vocalist Xenia Rubinos likes to play with syncopation. Her debut album, Magic Trix, is based around rhythms that sometimes are identifiable as Caribbean, and at other times veer into the experimental.

"It's something I have a lot of fun with — just taking one rhythmic figure and turning it around as many ways as I can," Rubinos says. "That's a huge part of my compositional process, just messing around with something very simple and seeing how far I can take it."

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Asia
6:41 am
Sun April 28, 2013

N. Korean Refugees Tell Tales of Ordinary, Desperate Lives

Courtesy of Sokeel Park

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

Sokeel Park sees the effects of North Korea's repressive government every day. He lives in South Korea, but works for an NGO named Liberty in North Korea. His job is to debrief those who've managed to leave the North and help them start new lives in the South.

Park says that with so much focus on the country's nuclear weapons and leadership, it's easy to forget about the 24 million people going about their everyday lives. Those lives are heavily controlled by the North Korean government, citizens are told where to work, where to live, and are not allowed to leave.

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The Two-Way
5:29 am
Sun April 28, 2013

The Challenges Of Making A Film In Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia film director Haifaa Al-Mansour (right) receives the award of best film for her movie Wadjda at Dubai International Film Festival in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on Dec. 16, 2012.
Ali Haider EPA/Landov

The Saudi Arabian movie Wadjda has been on a winning streak.

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It's All Politics
5:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

House Leadership Crashes Into Outside Hurdles On Bills

House Speaker John Boehner speaks to the media during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill on April 18.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

The House was set to vote this week on a bill modifying the president's health care law. The Republican bill was supported by the leadership, but ran into trouble and was pulled from the floor before the scheduled vote.

It's an example of the kind of obstacles Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, faces in getting legislation through the House. In many recent cases, his problem hasn't been the Democrats as much as members of his own party, backed by proudly conservative outside groups.

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Around the Nation
5:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

New Jersey Homeowners Say Flood Maps Will Add Huge Costs

A home damaged by Superstorm Sandy in Union Beach, N.J., sits on a raised platform to protect it from future flooding.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

Superstorm Sandy pummeled the East Coast six months ago, and, as with other natural disasters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency was there from day one, finding people temporary shelter and later supporting rebuilding efforts.

FEMA also has a lesser-known role. It oversees the creation of flood maps, which model the risk of flooding in different areas during storms. These maps are also used to set building codes and flood insurance rates. In New York and New Jersey, FEMA is updating those maps, and so far many homeowners don't like what they are seeing.

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Around the Nation
5:12 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Vermont To FEMA: Put Our Flooding On Your Maps

A house destroyed by Tropical Storm Irene sits in Rochester, Vt., in 2011.
John Curran AP

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

People in Vermont affected by floods in recent years now wish they could be included on the Federal Emergency Management Agency's flood maps.

The maps for the state are old and don't include flooding from fast-rising rivers and streams, the kind of flooding that tore up Vermont during Tropical Storm Irene.

Karin Hardy's house, built in 1850, once stood in Jamaica, Vt., across from the tranquil Ball Mountain Brook. But when Irene hit in August 2011, she heard boulders tumbling.

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Music Interviews
5:09 am
Sun April 28, 2013

Michael Bublé On Fishing, Sinatra And Auto-Tune

Michael Bublé's latest studio album, his eighth, is called To Be Loved.
Warwick Saint Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

In some ways, Michael Bublé is just of a different time. The songs the Canadian crooner sings are the Motown, jazz and swing classics he grew up listening to with his grandfather. Bublé says he misses the pure, unadulterated sound of music made back then — though he is willing to use a little Auto-Tune once in a while.

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Sunday Puzzle
5:01 am
Sun April 28, 2013

As You Know, Puzzles Are A Pastime

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 6:40 pm

On-air challenge: For each given category, name something in the category where the first letter is also the first letter of the category. For example, given "Military Ranks," you would say "Major."

Last week's challenge: Name a geographical location in two words — nine letters altogether — that, when spoken aloud, sounds roughly like four letters of the alphabet. What is it?

Answer: Aegean Sea; Indian Cay

Winner: Terry Thacker, Greenville, S.C.

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Code Switch
6:57 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

'I'm The Café And He's The Leche'

Café de Leche owner Anya Schodorf grew up in Managua, Nicaragua, and came to the U.S. when she was 14.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:06 pm

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Politics
5:39 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Conservative Shift Has Some Kansans Yearning For The Past

Karl and Twilla Eisele, of Wellsville, Kan., leave the old Brown School after voting on Nov. 6, 2012, in rural Wellsville, Kan. Recent elections have made the Kansas Legislature the most conservative in the state's history.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 8:17 pm

Kansan journalist Jason Probst says the Kansas he knows has disappeared.

"The great state of Kansas passed away on March 31, 2013 after a long and difficult battle with extremism," he wrote in an editorial for The Hutchinson News.

His faux obituary, lamenting Kansas' embrace of conservatism, went viral. Tens of thousands of people read it. Many were fellow Kansans who wrote to Probst to say they, too, were disturbed by their state's dramatic swing to the right.

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