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2:46 am
Wed May 8, 2013

With Gorgeous Dorms But Little Cash, Colleges Must Adapt

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

Many high school seniors who are heading to college this fall have just paid their tuition deposits — the first real taste of what the college experience is going to cost them. These students are heading to school at a time that some consider a transformative moment for American colleges and universities. Costs are skyrocketing, and there are some real questions about what value college students are getting for their money.

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NPR Story
10:56 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Mark Sanford Wins House Race

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In South Carolina tonight, a political comeback. Republican Mark Sanford, who was once mired in scandal as the state's governor, has won a congressional seat in a special election. He has defeated Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch in a race that attracted national attention. Sanford just delivered his victory speech.

MARK SANFORD: I have a question for you all. How many of you want to change Washington, D.C.?

(APPLAUSE)

SANFORD: I had a suspicion that that may be the case and...

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Sports
10:03 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Ladies, Want Women's Sports To Get More Attention? Pony Up

Indiana Fever guard Erin Phillips (right) drives past Phoenix Mercury forward DeWanna Bonner during the first half of their WNBA basketball game Aug. 25.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:47 am

Fans of women's sports often maintain that female athletics get short shrift from the media, so it had to be something of a surprise gift when ESPN presented the start of the WNBA's draft live.

This happened as it was announced that after two abject failures in the past decade, yet another professional soccer league for women will dare venture forth in the United States.

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Code Switch
7:11 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Are We Laughing With Charles Ramsey?

Charles Ramsey talks to media Tuesday as people congratulate him for having helped some women get out of a Cleveland home. Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, Michelle Knight and a 6-year-old girl were rescued from the house.
Scott Shaw The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 7:45 pm

It's hard out here for a black man the Internet accidentally thrusts into the limelight. Those 15 minutes ain't no joke.

Charles Ramsey, the Cleveland man who helped Amanda Berry escape from her captor and free her fellow captives, is already a full-fledged Thing On The Internet, primarily owing to a live local television news interview. During that interview, Ramsey proved himself a fantastic storyteller, and he kept it extra-extra-real.

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The Two-Way
7:06 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Study: 'Fossil' Words Are Older Than We Thought

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 7:23 pm

The origin of some of the words we use today go back much further than scientists once thought, suggesting an Ice Age-era proto-language that spawned many of the world's contemporary linguistic groups, according to a new study by a group of U.K.-based scientists.

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The Two-Way
6:58 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew Gets A New Signature

Jacob "Jack" Lew's signature, on the 2012 "Mid-Session Review" of the federal budget. He was director of the Office of Management and Budget at the time.
WhiteHouse.gov

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 9:49 am

Back in January, when Jacob "Jack" Lew was a mere nominee for the position of Secretary of the Treasury, we fretted about his signature. (It is, after all, displayed on the dollar.) It looked like a doodle, or as New York Magazine called it, a "slinky that has lost its spring."

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The Salt
6:54 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Bee Deaths May Have Reached A Crisis Point For Crops

A bee inspector checks on a frame of bees to assess the colony strength near Turlock, Calif., in February. More than 30 percent of America's bee colonies died off over the winter.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 10:56 pm

According to a new survey of America's beekeepers, almost a third of the country's honeybee colonies did not make it through the winter.

That's been the case, in fact, almost every year since the U.S. Department of Agriculture began this annual survey, six years ago.

Over the past six years, on average, 30 percent of all the honeybee colonies in the U.S. died off over the winter. The worst year was five years ago. Last year was the best: Just 22 percent of the colonies died.

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Classics in Concert
6:40 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Spring For Music: National Symphony Orchestra At Carnegie Hall

Conductor Christoph Eschenbach and the National Symphony Orchestra gave the final performance in this year's Spring for Music Festival at Carnegie Hall on May 11, 2013. The program was of all 20th-century Russian music: Shchedrin's Slava, Slava; Schnittke's Viola Concerto; and Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony.
Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 10:33 am

Program:

  • SHCHEDRIN: Slava, Slava
  • SCHNITTKE: Viola Concerto
  • SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5

  • National Symphony Orchestra
  • Christoph Eschenbach, music director
  • David Aaron Carpenter, viola
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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Colorado Theater Shooting Suspect Will Enter Insanity Plea

In a court filing today, lawyers for Colorado theater shooting suspect James Holmes said he intended to plead not guilty by reason of insanity.

Holmes will enter the plea, the court filing says, during a hearing on May 13.

Holmes is accused of opening fire in a crowded Aurora, Colo. movie theater, killing 12 people and injuring 70.

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Theater
5:37 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

'Show Boat' Steams On, Eternally American

When she's discovered to be a multiracial woman "passing" as white, the Cotton Blossom's star performer, Julie (Alyson Cambridge), is forced to leave the company.
Scott Suchman Washington National Opera

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:50 pm

It's been more than eight decades since Show Boat -- the seminal masterpiece of the American musical theater — premiered on a stage in Washington, D.C. Now the sprawling classic is back, in a lush production put on by the Washington National Opera.

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