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Barbershop
12:29 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Is 'Hip-Hop' Mayor's Sentence About Politics Or Justice?

Former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was sentenced to 28 years in prison for corruption. But do the Barbershop guys think the sentence was too stiff? They weigh in on that and the week's other top stories.

Health Care
12:29 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

In Mississippi, Bankruptcy Follows Broken Legs

According to a recent study, more than half of the Mississippians who file for bankruptcy do so because they cannot pay their medical bills. Clarion Ledger reporter Jerry Mitchell tells host Michel Martin what's causing such devastating costs.

Deceptive Cadence
12:00 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Next On The Verdi Channel

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, on Twitter @nprclassical, or on Facebook at NPR Classical.

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The Salt
11:09 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Drinking With Your Eyes: How Wine Labels Trick Us Into Buying

When the Hahn Family switched their Pinot Noir to this label, the wine started flying off the shelves.
Tucker & Hossler Courtesy of CF Napa Brand Design

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:34 pm

We're all guilty of it. Even if we don't want to admit it, we've all been suckered into grabbing a bottle of wine off the grocery store shelf just because of what's on the label. Seriously, who can resist the "see no evil" monkeys on a bottle of Pinot Evil?

But the tricks that get us to buy a $9 bottle of chardonnay — or splurge on a $40 pinot noir — are way more sophisticated than putting a clever monkey on the front.

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The Two-Way
11:09 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Report: Syrian Rebels Executed Pro-Regime Villagers

Rebel fighters from the Al-Ezz bin Abdul Salam Brigade train at an undisclosed location near the al-Turkman mountains in Latakia province, Syria, in April.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 12:59 pm

Human Rights Watch has accused Islamist Syrian rebels of slaughtering nearly 200 unarmed civilians belonging to the minority Alawite sect and kidnapping hundreds more during an offensive against pro-regime villages.

The New York-based group issued a 105-page report on Friday outlining the atrocities it says were committed on Aug. 4 in more than a dozen villages in Latakia province.

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All Tech Considered
11:08 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Health Site Stumbling, Twitter's Roots

Twitter Chairman and Square CEO Jack Dorsey.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 11:53 am

It's Friday, which means we're rounding up the tech headlines and our NPR coverage of technology and culture this week.

ICYMI

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Shots - Health News
11:03 am
Fri October 11, 2013

California Trains Helpers To Meet Demand For Health Insurance

Edward Avalos, one of the first certified enrollment specialists in California, is a very busy man.
Sarah Varney Kaiser Health News

Luisa Blue, head of the local Service Employees International Union in San Jose, Calif., has five more months to spend $1 million. The union received a grant from Covered California, the state's health insurance marketplace, to educate the public about the exchange.

SEIU is using some of the money to call people in their homes at night and on the weekend. "Over 4,000 (people) have said tell me more about Covered California and how can I enroll to get health insurance," Blue says of the union's first two weeks on the case.

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Parallels
10:41 am
Fri October 11, 2013

What You Need To Know About The Group That Won The Nobel

U.N. chemical weapons experts carry samples collected on Aug. 28 from a site of an alleged chemical weapons attack near the Syrian capital Damascus. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is dismantling Syria's chemical weapons stockpile, was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:40 am

The Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday awarded the 2013 peace prize to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, a group that's only recently been thrust into the spotlight as it works to dismantle Syria's chemical program.

The OPCW, which is based at the Hague, was established in 1997 and now has an annual budget of $100 million and a staff of about 500 people. Here's a profile of the group.

Where is the OPCW working?

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Monkey See
9:51 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Gravity' And The Thrill Of The Fiasco

NPR

I cannot lie: I love this week's podcast very much, and only partly because I got to include a song I probably haven't heard in over 20 years and got our special guest Gene Demby to reveal one of those little things that makes him apoplectic.

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TED Radio Hour
9:37 am
Fri October 11, 2013

What Do You Call Home?

"I think being a part of many places but not entirely of any one of them is a terrific emancipation" — Pico Iyer
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 9:25 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Identities.

About Pico Iyer's TEDTalk

Country and culture used to serve as the cornerstones of identity, but what does "home" mean to someone who comes from many places? Writer Pico Iyer talks about the meaning of home in a world where the old boundaries of nation-states no longer apply.

About Pico Iyer

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