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Parallels
3:12 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

India, China Top List Of Nations With Most Slaves

Child laborers wait to be processed at a safe house after being rescued during a raid at a factory in New Delhi by workers from Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) in June.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 6:45 pm

Nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide, with most of them in Asia and Africa, according to a report released Thursday.

The Walk Free Foundation's ranking incorporates factors that include the traditional definition of slavery β€” owning another person β€” as well as things such as child marriage and human trafficking.

Here are the highlights of the report:

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Post-Shutdown Palate Cleanser: Panda Cam Is Back!

The panda cub now weighs 5 pounds. This photo was taken Tuesday.
Courtney Janney Smithsonian's National Zoo

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 6:56 pm

If the ugliness in Washington left a bad taste in your mouth, we have the perfect palate cleanser.

The panda cam at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, which was shutdown along with the federal government, is back online. It means you can once again ogle the now eight-week-old cub and her mother, Mei Xiang.

The zoo writes:

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Mountain Stage
2:27 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Tony Rice On Mountain Stage

From left to right: John Hartford, Tony Rice, Jamie Hartford and Ramblin' Jack Elliott at Mountain Stage in 1989.
Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:30 am

Among bluegrass musicians, Tony Rice is universally regarded as the most important and influential guitarist in the genre's history. In the simplest terms, beginning with his first albums three decades ago, Rice all but single-handedly established the guitar as a lead instrument in bluegrass music.

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A Blog Supreme
2:23 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Five Songs By The 'Rhodes Scholar' Keyboardist Of Hip-Hop

Keyboardist and producer Bob James' 1970s work helped to establish the sound of smooth jazz β€” and lives on in hip-hop samples galore.
Courtesy of the artist

Professing love for Bob James' music can yield a side-eye in some circles. Jazz purists routinely view the keyboardist's 1970s period as a progenitor to smooth jazz β€” an idiom they frequently react to as if it were a sign of the apocalypse.

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Live in Concert
2:18 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Cults, Live In Concert

Cults performed live Wednesday at NPR Music's showcase at (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York.
Loren Wahl for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 3:45 pm

Set List

  • "High Road"
  • "Slow Song"
  • "Abducted"
  • "Always Forever"
  • "Were Before"
  • "You Know What I Mean"
  • "I Can Hardly Make You Mine"
  • "Go Outside"
  • "Keep Your Head Up"

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World Cafe
2:00 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Tedeschi Trucks Band On World Cafe

Tedeschi Trucks Band.
Mark Seliger Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:47 pm

Two of the best roots rock musicians of their generation make an appearance on a special episode of World Cafe, which is hosted in NPR's Studio A at the organization's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Singer Susan Tedeschi and her husband, guitarist Derek Trucks, joined forces in 2010 and formed the Tedeschi Trucks Band.

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All Songs Considered
1:51 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

The Good Listener: How Do I Name My Band, Anyway?

Hoobastank has sold more than 10 million albums. Does it really matter what you call your band?
Courtesy of the artist

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the new Pokemon 3DS games that have zombified our once-expressive children is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives β€” and, this week, tips on how to name one's band.

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Shots - Health News
1:34 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Houston, We Have Dengue Fever

Mosquitoes like thisΓ‚ Aedes aegypti female can spread dengue fever.
James Gathany CDC

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 5:03 pm

Dengue fever is in Houston. And it turns out the mosquito-borne illness isn't exactly a stranger there.

Dengue has been roaming around the city since 2003, according to a study published Wednesday. "There was dengue circulating, and we had no idea that it was here because we just weren't looking," says the study's lead author Dr. Kristy Murray of the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital.

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Television
1:31 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

'Dancing On The Edge' Is Fun For Both The Eyes And The Ears

Set in London in the early 1930s, Dancing on the Edge is a five-part miniseries about a black jazz band trying to crack the dance halls and radio playlists. Made for BBC-2, the episodes will air starting Saturday night on the Starz cable network.
Starz

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 4:52 pm

One of my most enjoyable parts of being a critic is steering people toward something so good, but so relatively obscure, that they might never have checked it out unless they'd been nudged in that direction. My personal best example of that, ever, was the imported BBC miniseries The Singing Detective, by Dennis Potter, about 25 years ago.

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Author Interviews
1:31 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Billy Crystal Finds Fun In Growing Old (But Still Can't Find His Keys)

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 3:48 pm

Billy Crystal isn't happy about turning 65, but at least he's finding a way to laugh about it. His new memoir β€” Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys? β€” is on the best-seller list, and he'll be back on Broadway in November.

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