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7:57 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Hey Hey Hey! Historian Draws Attention To '70s Black Animation Art

An original production cel from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. The show was among a burst of 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoons that featured positive African-American characters.
Courtesy of Pamela Thomas/Museum of UnCut Funk!

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 1:34 pm

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Food
7:48 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Want A New Twist On A Traditional Holiday Dish?

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with a new twist on a traditional holiday dish. No, I'm not talking about turducken. This year's novelty poultry might be the chickenbear. Russian artist Viktor Ivanov has created a teddy bear out of chicken meat, covered in chicken skin, with olives for eyes. British chef Simon Hulstone uploaded a photo of the meaty teddy and tweeted that he intends to serve it to his kids for Christmas dinner.

Now I want to know what he's putting in their stockings.

Around the Nation
7:47 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Snow Prints Lead Cops To Hiding Suspect

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

First Reads
7:03 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Exclusive First Read: Chang-rae Lee's 'On Such A Full Sea'

Chang-rae Lee won the PEN/Hemingway award for best first novel for 1995's Native Speaker. His most recent book was 2010's The Surrendered.
Annika Lee

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 9:37 am

Chang-rae Lee's new novel, On Such a Full Sea, opens in a surprisingly contented dystopia: Hundreds of years in the future, the world has unraveled; in America, the government has crumbled and the population has fled. But its abandoned cities have been given new life by immigrant workers, moved in by big multinational corporations to provide pristine fish and produce to elite enclaves. In B-mor (once known as Baltimore), workers from China have built a relatively stable and prosperous community — though outside the walls of B-mor, the open counties are still lawless and rough.

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Repairs Done, Astronauts Wrap Up Spacewalk

Astronaut Mike Hopkins during Saturday's spacewalk. He's going out again Tuesday.
NASA.gov

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 4:12 pm

Spacewalking astronauts have successfully replaced a failed coolant pump on the International Space Station.

NPR's Joe Palca reports that American spacewalkers Michael Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio had to bolt the massive pump in place (on the ground, it weighs 780 pounds), connect four ammonia lines and plug in five electrical cables. The ammonia is a refrigerant used in the station's two-part cooling system, which is necessary to dissipate heat from the onboard electrical equipment.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

What Does The Future Hold For Climate Change?

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And in these last days of 2013 we've been having conversations about the future. Rather than grand predictions, we've been seeking a realistic assessment of what lies ahead. So far we've explored cybersecurity, we've looked at the changing electorate. When it comes to climate change, the topic for today, Andrew Steer of the World Resources Institute told my colleague Steve Inskeep that the trends don't look very good.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Administration Extends Health Insurance Deadline Again

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene with Steve Inskeep. There's a lot of last-minute shopping going on today. And that goes for health insurance, too. Yesterday was supposed to be the deadline to sign up on the government's new insurance website for coverage that begins January first.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Lead Designer Of World's Most Popular Firearm Dies

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

1947 was the year the most notorious weapon in history was born. That is the "Avtomat Kalashnikov" or AK-47. Today millions of them, maybe 100 million, are in use. The man who helped bring the weapon to the world - Mikhail Kalashnikov - has now died, at age 94. Joining me now is C. J. Chivers. He's a reporter for the New York Times and author of "The Gun," a book about the A-K-47. Chris, welcome back to the program. C. J., welcome back to the program.

C.J. CHIVERS: Thanks very much for having me.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

USDA Grants Santa Special Livestock Permit

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. Our last word in business today - what else: Reindeer.

From Dasher to Prancer, Vixen to Cupid, and of course, Rudolph - all of Santa's reindeer have gotten the green light from the Agriculture Department to enter U.S. territory. It's very important. The USDA granted, quote, Mr. S. Claus a special livestock permit. And in the spirit of Christmas, the department even waived the normal application fees and disease testing requirement for his reindeer.

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