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12:58 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Chris Matthews Looks Back On A Time 'When Politics Worked'

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 2:49 pm

Before Chris Matthews grilled politicians and their surrogates on his MSNBC show Hardball, he was a top aide to House Speaker Tip O'Neill, advising him on how to deal with the press. Now Matthews has written a new book drawing on those experiences, called Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked.

It's a look at how Speaker O'Neill and President Reagan managed to work together and reach compromise in spite of the fact that they disagreed not only on policy, but also on the role of government.

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Environment
12:38 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

When Islands Pop Out Of The Sea

Pakistanis walk on an island that emerged off the coastline of the Arabian Sea following a deadly magnitude 7.7 earthquake in Pakistan's southern province of Baluchistan on Sept. 24.
Gwadar local government office AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 2:46 pm

When a mud volcano erupted last week and created a muddy mound of an island just off the southern coast of Pakistan, it seemed to us like a rather rare development.

But it turns out islands crop up fairly often. Charles Darwin commented on one. And it's been happening in shallow marshy patches off the coasts of Sweden and Finland for millennia.

Darwin's Find

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Food
12:33 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

300 Sandwiches The Secret To Boyfriend's Heart?

New York Post reporter Stephanie Smith sparked a firestorm online when she wrote about her plan to make her boyfriend 300 sandwiches - in exchange for an engagement ring. Host Michel Martin talks to Smith about her project, and the reaction to it.

Pop Culture
12:33 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Reporting On The Shutdown, One Facebook Post At A Time

Craig Thoricht's wife Linda.
Courtesy of Craig Thoricht

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:26 am

Shutting down the government is nothing new; Congress did it 18 years ago, suspending federal operations for three weeks.

History suggests Americans will accept the inconvenience for the duration, and Congress eventually will find a compromise.

But what if history is bunk? What if what we think we know about government shutdowns doesn't apply to this one?

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Law
12:33 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

DOJ Voting Lawsuit: Absurd Or Critical?

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 2:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me on short notice. So today, the country woke up to the shutdown of the federal government. We've been hearing from you about how this is affecting you and your budgets and your families. We'll hear what you've been telling us and we'll hear from two of the business reporters we turn to often to find out what they're hearing about the long and short-term impact on the country. That's in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

8 Great 'Shutdown Pickup Lines'

The fun has begun.
Twitter

When a government shutdown loomed in 2011, the Twitterverse had some fun with #govtshutdownpickuplines.

They're back!

Here are some of the better, slightly naughty ones we're seeing (we also also checked #shutdownpicklines):

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It's All Politics
12:07 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

The Panda Cam? That's Shut Down, Too

A self-portrait taken by the NASA exploration rover Curiosity in Gale crater on Mars.
NASA AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:17 am

By now, you've probably heard that the federal government shut down at 12:01 a.m. ET Tuesday after members of Congress were unable to reach a budget agreement in time to keep the government funded.

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

1 In 8 Suffers From Chronic Hunger Globally, U.N. Report Says

Schoolgirls eat a free midday meal in Hyderabad, India, last month. India has offered such meals since the 1960s to persuade impoverished parents to send their children to school. A U.N. report released Tuesday finds modest progress in the worldwide fight against chronic hunger.
Mahesh Kumar A. AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 1:17 pm

Worldwide, roughly 1 in 8 people suffered from chronic hunger from 2011 to 2013, according to a new report from three U.N. food agencies.

They concluded that 842 million people didn't get enough food to lead healthy lives in that period, a slight drop from the 868 million in the previous report.

The modest change was attributed to several factors, from economic growth in developing countries to investments in agriculture. And in some countries, people have benefited from money sent home by migrant workers. But the gains were unevenly distributed, the report's authors say.

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The Salt
11:46 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Now You Can Go To Harvard And Learn Cooking Science From Top Chefs

YouTube

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 1:50 pm

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Shots - Health News
11:45 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Exchange Shopping Starts Now, But No Need To Rush

Stephanie Groover of Independence Blue Cross provides information about coverage to commuters in Philadelphia on the opening day of the health insurance exchanges.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 5:26 pm

Well, today's the day health insurance marketplaces open for business. And despite a partial shutdown of the federal government and some technical jitters, they're available for insurance shoppers.

While Oct. 1 is a milestone in the implementation of the health law, other dates are likely more critical for consumers planning to shop for health insurance on their state marketplace.

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