Music

Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat January 5, 2013

Emel Mathlouthi: Voice Of The Tunisian Revolution

Emel Mathlouthi
Ghaith Ghoufa Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 5, 2013 9:59 am

With all that's going on in the Middle East right now, it's easy to forget that the Arab Spring began just two years ago in Tunisia.

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Best Music Of 2012
5:07 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

2 Chainz: A Pop Star For All Of Us

2 Chainz performing in London in November.
Joseph Okpako WireImage

Originally published on Sat January 5, 2013 9:43 am

Advisory: The videos on this page contain profanity and explicit imagery.

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World Cafe
3:29 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Cody ChesnuTT On World Cafe

Cody ChesnuTT.
John Ferguson Courtesy of the artist

Cody ChesnuTT's debut album, 2002's The Headphone Masterpiece, was the result of two years spent recording alone in his bedroom. The double-length record is at once both sprawling and intimate; it encompasses a wide array of genres, but ChesnuTT sings and plays nearly every part.

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A Blog Supreme
2:41 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Help Pick The Greatest Jazz Vocals Of All Time

Ella Fitzgerald, 1946.
William Gottlieb The Library of Congress

Our partners at Jazz24 — that's the Internet jazz radio service from Seattle-Tacoma's KPLU — are making a list of the 50 Quintessential Jazz Vocals of All Time. They'll create an online stream from the results, and they're looking for your help. Vote for up to three of your top picks via a simple online survey.

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Mountain Stage
2:03 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Jimmy LaFave On Mountain Stage

Jimmy LaFave.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Jimmy LaFave makes his seventh appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.V.

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Song Travels
11:59 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Wynton Marsalis On 'Song Travels'

Wynton Marsalis.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 12:30 pm

Trumpeter and composer Wynton Marsalis hails from one of New Orleans' most distinguished jazz families. He won a Pulitzer Prize for his oratorio Blood on the Fields, as well as multiple Grammy Awards and the National Medal of Arts, but his commitment to the improvement of life for all people is what demonstrates the best of his character and humanity.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:55 am
Fri January 4, 2013

And RuPaul Is From Poulenc

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 9:55 am

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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Remembrances
11:38 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Remembering 'Rescue Me' Singer Fontella Bass

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:04 pm

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Soul and gospel singer Fontella Bass, whose 1965 hit "Rescue Me" endures as one of the most recognizable soul records of the '60s, died last week on the day after Christmas. She was 72 years old. Despite the success of "Rescue Me," it was the number one R&B single for four weeks, it took years of litigation before Bass could claim her share of songwriting credit and royalties. In 1993, she sued American Express for using the song in a commercial and received what she said was a significant settlement.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:12 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

Not mainstream enough to mark? A portrait of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau taken circa 1965.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:25 pm

  • In its annual December feature called "The Music They Made" commemorating artists who have died in the preceding year, the New York Times Magazine once again neglected to include a single classical musician.
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Author Interviews
4:04 am
Fri January 4, 2013

The 'Life And Liberation' Of A Black Female Metal Fan

The singer Skin of Skunk Anansie performs at Brixton Academy in London last month. She wrote the foreword to Laina Dawes' What Are You Doing Here?: A Black Woman's Life and Liberation in Heavy Metal.
Simone Joyner Redferns via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 10:15 am

Music writer Laina Dawes is a die-hard Judas Priest fan. She's all about the band's loud and fast guitars, the piercing vocals — and she loves to see the group perform live.

Now, a fact that shouldn't matter: Dawes is a black woman. This, she says, can make things uncomfortable on the metal scene. She says she's been verbally harassed and told she's not welcome.

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