Music

Deceptive Cadence
3:07 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

At 100, Composer Margaret Bonds Remains A Great Exception

Margaret Bonds in 1956. Born in Chicago in 1913, Bonds became one of the first African-American female composers to gain recognition in the United States.
Carl Van Vechten Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 4:35 pm

Margaret Bonds, who died in 1972, is perhaps near the top of the very short list of African-American female composers. Thanks to her partnerships with Langston Hughes and soprano Leontyne Price and others, she's remembered in some circles as an important figure in American composition. But, mostly, she's been forgotten.

"It's amazing that people don't know who she was, although she was quite well known in her time," says Louise Toppin, an opera singer and a voice professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Music Interviews
5:49 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Robyn Hitchcock: 'Rock 'N' Roll Is An Old Man's Game Now'

Robyn Hitchcock's latest album is called Love from London.
Michèle Noach Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 8:38 am

Robyn Hitchcock turns 60 this weekend. The British singer and guitarist has traveled a long way to this point, beginning in the 1970s as the frontman of proto-punk group The Soft Boys and continuing through a solo career that has produced hundreds of songs. He's even appeared in a few films: Jonathan Demme showcased the singer in Storefront Hitchcock and gave him a cameo as a Russian operative in the 2004 verison of The Manchurian Candidate.

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Music Interviews
1:50 pm
Sat March 2, 2013

Rhye: Men Of Mystery Find A Feminine Sound

Rhye is the duo of Mike Milosh and Robin Hannibal. Their debut album is called Woman.
Dan Monick Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 9:39 am

Last year, an unknown band called Rhye started posting exquisitely produced videos online. The clips were sexy — erotic even — and the music matched the images. The identities of the band members were a mystery, intentionally shielded from view.

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Commentary
8:11 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Pianist Van Cliburn, Warmed Russian Hearts During Cold War

Van Cliburn accepts flowers from the audience in the Moscow Conservatory in April 1958, after a performance during the first International Tchaikovsky Competition, which he won.
Courtesy Van Cliburn Foundation AP

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 6:35 pm

Van Cliburn thawed out the Cold War.

He went to Moscow in 1958 for the first International Tchaikovsky Competition. When he sat down to play, Russians saw a tall, 23-year-old Texan, rail thin and tousle-haired, with great, gangly fingers that grew evocative and eloquent when he played the music of the true Russian masters — Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky, and Borodin.

Cliburn died Wednesday at his home in Fort Worth, Texas. He was 78.

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Favorite Sessions
8:03 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Juan De Marcos And The Afro-Cuban All Stars: Dig That 'Dundunbanza'

Juan de Marcos González of the Afro-Cuban All Stars performs live for Jazz24.
Justin Steyer Jazz24

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 4:22 pm

Many music lovers know Juan de Marcos González as the man who teamed up with guitarist Ry Cooder to create Buena Vista Social Club. But González was busy celebrating the history of Cuban music long before Cooder arrived on the scene.

Concurrently with the Buena Vista project, González was recording an album with his own band, The Afro-Cuban All Stars. The orchestra now contains expatriate Cuban musicians, young and old alike, from around the world.

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Music Interviews
6:05 am
Sat March 2, 2013

By A Record Collector's Curiosity, The Relatives Return

The Relatives.
Sam Butler Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 1:29 pm

In 1970, brothers Gean and Tommie West, both reverends, started a gospel group together in Dallas. They called themselves The Relatives, pressed a few singles and amassed a good following.

By 1980, The Relatives had gone their separate ways, and for three decades that was that. But a few years ago, a Texas DJ and record collector who'd heard their music came knocking, and brought up the idea of a reunion. Now, they're releasing their first album of original work in 30 years, The Electric Word.

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All Songs Considered
6:05 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Pink Floyd's 'Dark Side,' 40 Years Later

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 11:04 am

It begins with a heartbeat. Released in 1973, The Dark Side of the Moon was Pink Floyd's eighth studio album. It would become one of the best-selling albums of all time, and its iconic cover image still hangs in college dormitories everywhere.

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Music Interviews
6:05 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Emmylou Harris And Rodney Crowell: Staying Low

Rodney Crowell and Emmylou Harris' new collaborative album is titled Old Yellow Moon.
David McClister Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 11:45 am

Almost 40 years after their first collaboration, Emmylou Harris and former bandmate Rodney Crowell are back with a new album of duets.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:25 pm
Fri March 1, 2013

Marches Madness: John Philip Sousa's 'Washington Post'

Circa 1910: A program advertising John Philip Sousa and his band.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

It's Marches Madness! Throughout this month, we're posting some of our favorite marches — from the concert hall, opera stage and parade ground. Got one we should hear? Played any yourself? Let us know in the comments section.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
2:48 pm
Fri March 1, 2013

Kevin Eubanks On Piano Jazz

Kevin Eubanks.
Raj Naik Courtesy of the artist

On this episode of Piano Jazz, guitarist and former Tonight Show bandleader Kevin Eubanks joins Marian McPartland for a set featuring music by Cole Porter, the Gershwins, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane.

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