Music

Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Dave Matthews Takes John Denver's Music 'To Tomorrow'

Album cover

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 10:31 am

By the time John Denver died in a plane crash in 1997, he had written and sung a remarkable assortment of cherished music: "Rocky Mountain High," "Take Me Home, Country Roads," "Sunshine on My Shoulders," "Leaving on a Jet Plane" and many more. He was often mocked by edgier musicians for being a kind of musically soft, spongy Wonderbread of a singer-songwriter. But his songs have endured — and influenced more than one generation.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Extreme Drama: The Life And Music Of Richard Wagner

Rudolph Cronau's drawing of Wagner's opera house, Bayreuth, flanked by his birthplace (left) and place of death.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 10:11 am

Richard Wagner was, and still is today, arguably the most controversial figure in classical music. A self-appointed deity and hyperdriven genius, Wagner is often considered the ultimate megalomaniac. He dreamed up and achieved a single-minded plan to change the course of classical music history.

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The Record
5:20 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

The Music Of The Venezuelan Presidential Campaigns

Alvaro Perez volunteers as a DJ at a socialist party stand in Caracas, Venezuela, playing songs in support of candidate Nicolas Maduro.
Jasmine Garsd NPR

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:07 pm

On Sunday, voters in Venezuela will head to the polls, and in Caracas, the noise level is as high as voters' emotions. There is a background noise that accompanies everyday life in Latin America, a constant soundtrack: music blaring from food stands and cars, loud automobiles that are so run-down they defy the laws of physics, street vendors yelling product names. I've spoken to many immigrants to the U.S. who, like me, first arrived to live in the suburbs and found the absence of bochinche, or ruckus, maddening.

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World Cafe: Sense Of Place
3:03 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

What Are The Five Most Important Country Records Ever?

Ernest Tubb Record Shop in Nashville, Tenn.
WXPN

At World Cafe, we recently asked Stephen Bowen of the Ernest Tubb Record Shop in Nashville, Tenn., to name the five most important country records of all time. The store was founded by country pioneer Ernest Tubb, who had a hit with the early honky-tonk song "Walking the Floor Over You." More than 65 years later, the shop is still known as a hub for country-music fans.

Bowen polled the store's online community to help choose these tracks.

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The Salt
2:19 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Bands Aren't The Only Things That Incubate At Music Festivals

Customers line up for an ice cream van at the 2011 Glastonbury Music Festival in southwest England.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:04 pm

Coachella, the massive outdoor music festival that kicks off this weekend in Indio, Calif., has become an "incubator" not just for new bands, but for rising food entrepreneurs, according to a story in the San Jose Mercury News earlier this week.

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Mountain Stage
2:14 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Piney Gir On Mountain Stage

Piney Gir performs live on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 9:55 am

Piney Gir (a.k.a. Angela Penhaligon) makes her first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va. Originally from Kansas City, Penhaligon grew up in a strict Pentecostal home; her father was a minister who forbade TV and modern popular music. She eventually relocated to London, where she threw herself into music and dabbled in everything from garage-rock and punk to country and electronic music.

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Piano Jazz With Jon Weber
2:03 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Laurence Hobgood On Piano Jazz

Laurence Hobgood.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 1:51 pm

Pianist and 2010 Grammy winner Laurence Hobgood was born in Salisbury, N.C., and grew up in Texas and Illinois. He took up piano at age 6 and showed a knack for improvisation early on, playing his own versions of pieces by Bach and Chopin. In 1988, Hobgood relocated to Chicago, where he met an up-and-coming vocalist named Kurt Elling.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
1:58 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Eddie Palmieri On Piano Jazz

Eddie Palmieri.
Jason Goodman Courtesy of the NEA

On this episode of Piano Jazz, pianist and 2013 NEA Jazz Master Eddie Palmieri brings along bassist Hugo Duran and percussionists Jose Claussell, Richie Flores, and Mark Quinones for a raucous set of original tunes with an Afro-Caribbean flavor.

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All Songs Considered
1:02 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Altar Of Plagues: Scalding, Industrial Chants From Ireland

Altar of Plagues.
Barbora Mrazkova Courtesy of the artist

There's something to be said for unconventional artists who can still connect to an audience. The band Broadcast funneled oddball library-catalog music through dreamy space-pop. Shabazz Palaces is hip-hop's cubist Sun Ra. Altar of Plagues, which works outside the roots of black metal, knows a thing or two about unconventional sounds. But the Irish band has, until now, strictly been a longform outfit, stretching drones and abrasive tones across sides of vinyl.

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Song Travels
12:52 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Neil Sedaka On 'Song Travels'

"I like the emotional criers," Neil Sedaka says of ballads.
Courtesy of the artist

Neil Sedaka is synonymous with popular music. For more than 50 years, he's written, performed and produced the soundtrack for America's collective psyche. Sedaka had a string of early-1960s pop hits, and his songs have been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Connie Francis, Elvis Presley and The Monkees, among others.

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