Music

Pop Culture
11:58 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Was Miley Twerking Or Just Trying?

Miley Cyrus' provocative performance at the MTV Video Music Awards got some people clapping, but many more fingers wagging. Host Michel Martin talks about the cultural implications of twerking.

Music
11:15 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Philly Folk Fest

Spirit Family Reunion / Camp Stage

The 52nd Philadelphia Folk Festival kicked off on Thursday night and ran through Sunday evening.  Perhaps because of superstition and a desire for nice weather, the sign for main stage noted "2012 + 1."  With the exception of a brief light rain Sunday afternoon, the August days were remarkable with highs in the low 80's and cool nights complemented by warm campfires in the campground.

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Mountain Stage
11:08 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Jimmy LaFave On Mountain Stage

Jimmy LaFave performs on Mountain Stage in 2001.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Jimmy LaFave kicked off this episode from the Mountain Stage archives, recorded in May of 2001. LaFave honing his skills as a songwriter while hosting an open-mic in Austin, Texas. And when he began recording his own songs, veteran rock critic Dave Marsh praised him as "one of America's greatest voices." Though he's made his home in Austin for over 2 decades, LaFave has maintained a connection to Oklahoma's musical heritage, most notably that of folk icon Woody Guthrie. LaFave plays his own tunes here, with one exception – Gretchen Peters' "On a Bus to St.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:04 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Finding Nature, Rage And Humor In Modern American Symphonies

The AIDS Memorial Quilt on display at the Washington Monument in October 1992. The AIDS crisis is the subject of John Corigliano's Symphony No. 1, "Of Rage And Remembrance."
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The symphony after World War II appeared to be headed for extinction as composers took divergent paths to experiment with musical language and forms. But the evidence of recent decades shows that the genre was never really on the verge of disappearing.

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Music
10:06 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Bethlehem American Legion on Community Band of the Lehigh Valley

George Fennell interviews Mitch Huston, business manager of the Bethlehem American Legion Band, during today's program. Mitch is the son of the founder, Ray Huston, who just retired as director after 66 years. George Fennel took over the post in March and plays some selections recorded by the band.

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Favorite Sessions
8:29 am
Thu August 29, 2013

KCRW Presents: Daughn Gibson

Daughn Gibson performs live on KCRW's Morning Becomes Eclectic.
Larry Hirshowitz KCRW

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 1:23 pm

With his distinctive baritone voice and his art-rock spin on contemporary country music, Daughn Gibson didn't have a hard time grabbing our attention. Clad in a ripped-up Garth Brooks shirt he'd acquired the night before, this one-time truck driver took us along for the ride with songs like "You Don't Fade" from his new album, Me Moan.

Watch Daughn Gibson's entire Morning Becomes Eclectic session at KCRW.com.

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All Songs Considered
8:03 am
Thu August 29, 2013

First Watch: Zola Jesus, 'Fall Back'

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 8:25 am

I suppose it would be natural, if you grew up relatively isolated in a Wisconsin forest, to find yourself fascinated by cities. And so it is for the 24-year-old Russian-American singer Nika Roza Danilova, best known as Zola Jesus. In the video for her song "Fall Back," from the new album Versions, we see Nika in two settings: the vast coldness of urban concrete and the nature of the forest. "Shooting in the forest was very important," Nika writes. "The forest is raw and naked, which is in line for my intent for Versions.

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A Blog Supreme
8:03 am
Thu August 29, 2013

How One Singer Made Four Debut Albums

Sathima Bea Benjamin in 1974.
Ian Bruce Huntley Courtesy of Matsuli Music

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 8:31 am

About a month before she died last week at age 76, Sathima Bea Benjamin finally properly celebrated her debut album. That's a bit of a complicated claim, of course, because depending on how you count, the South African vocalist either made her debut album in 1959, 1963, 1976 or 1979.

In 1959, as Beatty Benjamin, she recorded the LP My Songs for You. It was produced by the pianist Dollar Brand, who was later known as Abdullah Ibrahim; he was also her boyfriend and later became her husband. However, it was never released.

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The NPR 100
6:20 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:26 pm

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

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Music
12:15 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Neko Case Takes Your Questions

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 1:41 pm

Join us at 12:30 p.m. ET this Thursday, August 29, for a live listening party with Neko Case. We'll play her new, epically titled album, The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, in its entirety. Afterward, Case will join All Songs Considered co-host Robin Hilton and NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson to discuss the record and take questions from listeners. You can post your questions in a chat room we'll open during the webcast. Or you can tweet your questions: #askneko

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