Music

Music News
5:24 am
Sat January 11, 2014

Sax Great Jimmy Heath 'Walked With Giants,' And He's Still Here

Jimmy Heath and friends at a session at New York's WOR Studios in 1953. Left to right: Miles Davis, Kenny Drew, Art Blakey, Jimmy Heath.
Temple University Press / Jimmy Heath collection

Originally published on Sat January 11, 2014 11:31 am

In the room he uses as a practice space and office in his apartment in Corona, Queens, Jimmy Heath recalls a hit record from long ago.

"It's a song Bill Farrell, a popular singer, had years ago," he says, and then sings: "You've changed, you're not the angel I once knew / No need to tell me that we're through / It's all over now, you've changed." Then the 5'3" musician with the big sound picks up his tenor saxophone and blows.

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The Two-Way
5:09 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Dying Stars Write Their Own Swan Songs

This composite image shows new details of the aftermath of a massive star that exploded and was visible from Earth over 1,000 years ago.
Chandra X-ray Observatory Center NASA

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 7:48 pm

Alicia Soderberg studies the death of stars. Often, these final moments come as violent explosions known as supernovae. They're spectacular events, but catching one as it unfolds can be tricky.

"You have to be in the right place at the right time, and often we're not," says the professor in Harvard's astronomy department. "So all you can do is do a stellar autopsy and go back and try to pick up the pieces and try to figure out what happened."

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World Cafe
4:07 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Rosanne Cash On World Cafe

Rosanne Cash's The River & The Thread comes out Jan. 14.
Clay Patrick McBride Courtesy of the artist

Two things have come together for Rosanne Cash in recent years: her deepening understanding of her place in her father Johnny Cash's legacy, and her desire to only make albums that expand on a theme.

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Song Travels
2:37 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

John Proulx On 'Song Travels'

John Proulx.
Courtesy of the artist

Vocalist, pianist and composer John Proulx has a voice that recalls another great all-around musician, the late Chet Baker.

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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Marian McPartland On Piano Jazz, Part Two

Piano Jazz continues with part two of a monumental session (here's part one), as host Marian McPartland sits down as a guest on the program with guest host Elvis Costello. In this all-new interview, McPartland and Costello celebrate more moments from 30-plus years of Piano Jazz.

Beginnings In England

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Music Reviews
12:29 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Rosanne Cash: Seeking A 'Thread' Through Southern History

Rosanne Cash.
Clay Patrick McBride Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 2:30 pm

For the past two decades, Rosanne Cash has lived with her family in Manhattan, but in 2008, she was asked if she wanted to help with a project to restore the childhood home of her father, Johnny Cash, in the small town of Dyess, Ark. She agreed and went down there to do some fundraising — and in the process, she and her husband, producer-songwriter-guitarist John Leventhal, took some car trips throughout the South, soaking up history and music.

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Music
12:09 am
Fri January 10, 2014

On the Next Galactic Travels 2014-01-16

On the mext Galactic Travels...
Credit Bill Fox / WDS Productions

On the next Galactic Travels, a month-long Special Focus on Detlef Keller continues.  The Featured CD at Midnight will be Behind the Tears on Manikin Records.

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Remembrances
5:02 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Amiri Baraka's Legacy Both Controversial And Achingly Beautiful

Amiri Baraka, shown here in 1972, was a renowned poet whose politics strongly shaped his work.
Julian C. Wilson AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:31 am

One of America's most important — and controversial — literary figures, Amiri Baraka, died on Thursday from complications after surgery following a long illness, according to his oldest son. Baraka was 79.

Baraka co-founded the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. His literary legacy is as complicated as the times he lived through, from his childhood — where he recalled not being allowed to enter a segregated library — to the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. His poem about that attack, "Somebody Blew Up America," quickly became infamous.

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Music Interviews
4:26 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

This Expensive Rubber Mat Could Be The Synth Of The Future

Fitted with rubbery keys and advanced electronics, the Seaboard was designed to realistically mimic other instruments by letting players pull off subtle bends and slides between notes.
Roli

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 10:06 am

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The Record
3:43 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

An Under-The-Radar Albums Preview For 2014

Trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, whose album, the imagined savior is far easier to paint, will be released on March 11.
Emra Islek Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 9:40 am

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