Arts

Kitchen Window
4:51 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

The International Flavors Of All-American Coleslaw

Courtesy of Ben Fink

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 9:08 am

I encountered what's called "coleslaw" for the first time on the Fourth of July, at a picnic at the home of my graduate school professor. I had come to America from South India for school, and until then, I had no idea what "coleslaw" was.

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Summer Books 2012
7:32 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reading Romance Between (And Under) The Covers

Harriet Russell

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 10:13 pm

I grew up in a house full of poetry and the classics. Slim, gloomy volumes filled the bookshelves and piled up on the tables. My father, Robert Bly, recited anti-war poetry at the supper table; my mother, Carol Bly, preferred lugubrious Russian novelists and would counter with ethical advice gleaned from Turgenev.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Aretha, Einstein And Knowing 'Too Much'

Express Newspapers Getty Images

America is a nation of fans. And though you might not know it by whichever forgettable pop singers are currently shooting up the Top 40 chart, we're serious about our music. "You can dispute folks' politics or theology and still drink with them," as Anthony Heilbut writes in his entertaining new essay collection, The Fan Who Knew Too Much. "But [tell me], for example ... that Bob Dylan's music is 'worthless' and, well, you're on your own." This is true.

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Fine Art
3:02 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reflective Art Brings Light, Color To Historic Spaces

Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot's Red Bowl installation in Beauvais, France, recalls the way lepers once bathed in animal blood in an effort to cure themselves and avoid being ostracized to the one-time leprosarium where the installation is located.
Courtesy of Cao | Perrot Studio

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 1:03 pm

This is a story about amazing beauty, imagination and magical effects — and it begins, ironically enough, at a one-time leprosarium, or hospital for lepers, in Beauvais, France, a small town outside Paris.

Lepers were sequestered in Beauvais in the 12th century. That history is now noted in an outdoor art installation made up of slim metal rods that curve up into the shape of a bowl. Each rod is tipped with a red, marble-sized glass ball.

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Books
3:01 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Four Books To Help You Master Chicago Politics

Southern Illinois University Press

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:08 am

The term "Chicago politics" gets bandied about whenever people complain about what they see as corruption and abuse of power.

Republicans often apply the concept to President Obama, who calls Chicago home. Earlier this year, presidential candidate Mitt Romney called one of the president's appointments "Chicago-style politics at its worst," and Illinois Republican Aaron Schock once described Obama's team as "the Chicago machine apparatus."

But what does that mean? And what are Chicago politics really like?

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Author Interviews
5:13 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

As The Earth Slows, This 'Miracle' Becomes Calamity

Emrah Turudu iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

Imagine waking up to find that Earth's rotation has slowed — inexplicably — and the 24-hour day now has 56 extra minutes. And imagine what happens if Earth turns more and more slowly — still for no reason — until days last as long as weeks.

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Remembrances
1:38 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Broadway's Richard Adler

Celebrated composer and lyricist Richard Adler has died at the age of 90.
Bob Gomel Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on Aug. 9, 1990.

In 1955, The New York Times called Richard Adler and his writing partner, Jerry Ross, "Broadway's hottest young composers." Together, they wrote the music and lyrics for The Pajama Game and Damn Yankees, two shows that became known for the songs "Hey There," "Steam Heat," "Hernando's Hideaway" and "Whatever Lola Wants."

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Opinion
12:26 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Taboo Revival: Talking Private Parts In Public Places

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:35 am

Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air. His new book, Ascent of the A-Word, will be appearing this summer.

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Movie Interviews
12:18 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Alec Baldwin: A 'Rock' Throughout The Ages

Club owner Dennis Dupree (Alec Baldwin, left) and his assistant Lonny Barnett (Russell Brand) try to figure out a way to keep their nightclub open in the movie adaptation of Rock of Ages.
David James David James

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:38 pm

Alec Baldwin stars in two movies this summer — and they couldn't be more different.

In Woody Allen's To Rome with Love, Baldwin joins an ensemble cast including Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page, Roberto Benigni and Penelope Cruz as they romp around the Eternal City — running into trouble, weathering existential crises and falling in — and out — of love.

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Pop Culture
11:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Art Imitates Life In Same-Sex Superhero Wedding

It's wedding season for couples around the country, including superheroes. Marvel Comics, the group behind Spider-man, X-Men and the Avengers, recently released a comic featuring its first same-sex superhero wedding. Host Michel Martin discusses the intersection between the Marvel universe and politics with Marvel's editor-in-chief, Axel Alonso.

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