Arts

Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!
4:41 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Sandwich Monday: The All-American Burger

With a couple slices of grilled bread, you can make even the most dangerous thing look innocuous in satellite photos.
NPR

The Daniel family wrote in to recommend the All-American Burger from Saloon Steakhouse here in Chicago. We're not sure if they were recommending it because they thought we'd like it, or as a vicious plot to put us all in food comas, because as soon as we got to "burger between two grilled cheese sandwiches," we stopped reading and went to go get it.

Eva: It's so annoying whenever I hang out with burger, grilled cheese is ALWAYS there too.

Blythe: I feel like I'm just eating the entire kid's menu in one sandwich.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
3:58 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

'In The Attic': Whips, Witches And A Peculiar Princess

cover detail
Simon and Schuster

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 7:57 pm

Gillian Flynn's most recent novel is Gone Girl.

At age 13, I survived almost entirely on green apple Jolly Ranchers and Flowers in the Attic, and to this day I can't look at the book without my mouth watering. My much loved copy must have come from a supermarket (it was impossible to go to a supermarket in the '80s to, say, secretly stock up on green apple Jolly Ranchers, without a V.C. Andrews book lurking by checkout).

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Author Interviews
12:43 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Unraveling The Genetic Code That Makes Us Human

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 3:18 pm

There's enough DNA in the human body to stretch from the sun to Pluto and back. But don't confuse DNA with your genes, says writer Sam Kean.

"They are sort of conflated in most people's minds today but they really are distinct things," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "Genes are like the story and DNA is the language that the story is written in."

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Poetry
10:07 am
Mon July 23, 2012

It's A Genre! The Overdue Poetry Of Parenthood

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 2:26 pm

Birth, most people would agree, is a fairly important event. And poetry, most people would agree, tends to focus on subjects of intense emotional significance. So one would think the poetry of early parenthood would be a rich and varied category, filled with reflections on physical transformation, the emergence of life, the realities of infanthood and so forth.

One would be wrong.

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Monkey See
9:54 am
Mon July 23, 2012

Press Tour 2012: That Tiger Isn't Wearing Any Pants, And Other Controversies

Daniel Tiger of Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, coming soon to PBS.
PBS

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 2:50 pm

Admittedly, PBS would have had a hard time living up to the experience of its first day at this summer's Television Critics Association's press tour here in Pasadena — the omelets, the cast of Downton Abbey, all that. But its second day started where a lot of people start with PBS: with kid stuff.

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Crime In The City
5:14 am
Mon July 23, 2012

Jo Nesbo's Fiction Explores Oslo's Jagged Edges

Crime novelist Jo Nesbo says despite Oslo's well-kept streets and sharply dressed residents, the city has a dark and seedy side.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:52 pm

The sun descends reluctantly over Norway's waterside capital, but novelist Jo Nesbo is determined to show Oslo's dark side, to convince me the real city, in parts, is as dirty, twisted and seedy as his own fictional version.

It's a tough sell in this city of bike helmets, clean streets and smiling blond people.

The author has written nine successful novels about the reckless Oslo police detective Harry Hole, a nonconformist with a mercurial mind.

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Author Interviews
3:29 pm
Sun July 22, 2012

'Savages' Return In 'The Kings Of Cool'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 10:05 am

Oliver Stone's latest film, Savages, opened in theaters earlier this month. The movie centers on two young marijuana growers, Ben and Chon, who live and deal in California, alongside their girlfriend O — short for Ophelia. They find themselves thrust into a world of violence and murder when a Mexican drug cartel comes after their business. The film is based on the book by crime writer Don Winslow, who also co-wrote the screenplay.

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Monkey See
11:03 am
Sun July 22, 2012

Not Funny Enough? 'New Yorker' Gives 'Seinfeld' Cartoon A Second Chance

"I wish I was taller," was Elaine's caption in the 1998 episode of Seinfeld. Can it get funnier than that? You can try over on The New Yorker's Caption Contest page.
Courtesy The New Yorker

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 2:43 pm

In its final season, the TV sitcom Seinfeld did a send-up of the cartoons in The New Yorker. The magazine's comics are distinctive – short, quippy, topical, understated. Simply put, they're smart.

Maybe too smart, sometimes, and that's what the character Elaine found when she got her own cartoon published in the magazine.

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Monkey See
10:19 am
Sun July 22, 2012

'Free Bates': The Third Season Of 'Downton Abbey' And More From PBS

Hugh Bonneville, who plays the Earl of Grantham on Downton Abbey, shows his feelings during the press tour presentation Saturday night.
Rahoul Ghose PBS

Yesterday was the first day of the Television Critics Association press tour, when TV reporters and critics descend upon Beverly Hills to hear about what's to come in the next six or eight months. We'll hear from all the big broadcast networks and most of the big (and not-so-big) cable outlets, but we're starting this year with PBS.

Candidly, not all the critics are showing up for PBS — not all of them write about it very much. It's a shame, though, because yesterday may have been, on the whole, the liveliest day I've ever had at press tour.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Sun July 22, 2012

'Who's On First?' The Sign Language Version

A screen grab from the MLB video, "Costas and Seinfeld on Network."
MLB

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 2:43 pm

Abbott and Costello's famous "Who's on First?" routine still stands as one of the greatest comedy sketches of all time. It was a feat of rapid-fire dialogue, flawless comedic timing and devastating wit.

But could you do it without saying a word?

The answer appears to be yes. After Jerry Seinfeld broke down the classic skit on the MLB Network recently, NPR's Mike Pesca wound up with a peculiar email in his inbox.

It was a link to an American Sign Language (ASL) version of the skit, sent by a friend. It was amazing, Pesca says.

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