Arts

Movie Reviews
5:09 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

For Bootlegger Brothers, A Twisty Path To Profit

Jack Bondurant (Shia LeBeouf) finds escape from the brutality of his family's bootlegging business in the company of the radiant Bertha (Mia Wasikowska).
Richard Foreman Jr., SMPSP The Weinstein Co.

John Hillcoat's Lawless opens with a scene in which two farm boys urge their younger brother to pull the trigger on a pig that's ready to be transformed into bacon. The boy, whose name is Jack, hesitates and then misfires; one of the older boys finishes the job, neatly and dispassionately.

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Movie Reviews
4:04 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

An 'Ambassador' Of Sorts, But Hardly Diplomatic

Mads Brugger, in character as diplomat Mads Cortzen, conferences with various members of the Central African Republic's government.
Drafthouse Films

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 4:42 pm

"If the Congo was the heart of darkness, this is the spleen."

That's how Danish guerrilla filmmaker Mads Brugger introduces the Central African Republic, the focus of his hidden-camera documentary The Ambassador.

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Arts
3:12 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Blast Furnace Blues Festival on Lehigh Valley Arts Salon

Hosts Jack Adams welcomes Patrick Brogan of ArtsQuest, and musician Craig Thatcher to the program to discuss The Blast Furnace Blues Festival, happening September 14-16 at the ArtsQuest Center in Bethlehem.

Author Interviews
2:34 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

'Real Romney' Authors Dissect His Latest Campaign

Michael Kranish (left) is the deputy chief of the Washington bureau of The Boston Globe. Scott Helman is a staff writer at The Globe. Both have covered politics, presidential campaigns and Congress.
courtesy of the authors

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 12:17 pm

In The Real Romney, Boston Globe reporters Michael Kranish and Scott Helman examine Mitt Romney's political rise since 1994, when he ran for the U.S. Senate in Massachusetts. They explain how Romney shifted from supporting abortion rights to heavily courting social conservatives in the 2008 Republican primary.

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The Picture Show
1:51 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Drinking, Dancing, Dolly Parton: Photos Of The '70s Country Music Scene

Last Call, Tootsie's Orchid Lounge, Nashville, Tenn., 1974
Henry Horenstein

It may come as a surprise that the photographer who shot these country stars — and their fans — is from Massachusetts. But, Henry Horenstein explains, country music "was a rural music, not necessarily a Southern music."

As a young photographer, Horenstein spent a good part of the 1970s and early '80s at bluegrass festivals, Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, New England honky-tonks and elsewhere, documenting what he believed was an "era that was going to go away."

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Monkey See
12:12 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Nobody, Not Even Your Mom, Has Such Small Hands: 10 Other Products 'For Her'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 4:04 am

Okay, so Bic has been taking a lot of flack for selling this pen "for her." (As it says on its web site, it is "a ball pen essentially for women," although that seems to invite a caveat, such as, "although there may be certain men to whom it appeals and we don't judge.")

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Monkey See
8:33 am
Tue August 28, 2012

YouTube Trends: Politics And Pop, Yes, But Education And Science, Too

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Broken Hearts And Dirty Minds In 'Fundamentals'

The first and most important thing you need to know about Jonathan Evison's heartbreaking, maddening novel The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving is that one of its two main characters is a paralyzed teenage boy, named Trevor. The other is a grown man, Ben, who frequently acts like a teenage boy. Your enjoyment of the book — the follow-up to Evison's well-regarded West of Here — will be largely predicated on how much you like listening in on can-you-top-this, gross-out sex talk, and ruefully self-demeaning descriptions of the female of the species.

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Games & Humor
5:30 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

How Madden NFL's Business Lineup Helps It Win Big

According to the NFL's Peter O'Reilly, fans are drawn to the Madden NFL video game franchise because it lets them experience the NFL year-round in a realistic way.
EA Sports

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 3:52 pm

The Madden NFL video game franchise has sold close to 100 million copies, a number that will only go up on Tuesday when Madden NFL 13 hits shelves. Madden is the biggest franchise of its kind in North America, and big business for an enormous, tangled web of interested parties. Just ask Tommy Mullings — he craves football.

"After the football's done, like, I can't get enough football," he says. "So I'll go watch football all day and then end my Sunday with a couple of games of Madden."

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My Guilty Pleasure
5:08 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

'The Magus': A Thrilling, Chilling Guilty Pleasure

cover detail

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:23 pm

Nick Dybek is the author of When Captain Flint Was Still a Good Man.

The sinister face sneering from the cover is reason enough to keep John Fowles' The Magus tucked discreetly away. Then there's the 600 or so pages inside, which are filled with pretentious riffs on psychoanalysis, metaphysics, fascism and the occult.

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