Arts

Movie Interviews
2:10 pm
Thu August 13, 2015

A 'Diary' Unlocked: A Teenage Coming-Of-Age Story Put On Film

Bel Powley stars as Minnie Goetze in The Diary of a Teenage Girl. Directed by Marielle Heller, the film is based on a semi-autobiographical graphic novel by Phoebe Gloeckner.
Sam Emerson Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 8:59 am

Graphic artist and professor Phoebe Gloeckner had an unconventional upbringing. When she was 15, she lost her virginity to an older man — who also happened to be her mother's boyfriend. Gloeckner chronicled the experience in her teenage diaries, which she put aside and then revisited when she found them decades later.

"I remember I opened the box with the diaries and I was just stunned to start reading," Gloeckner tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "To hear this child's voice, kind of, talking to me as an adult, it felt like it was crying out to be heard."

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Book Reviews
10:03 am
Thu August 13, 2015

Kafka Would Love 'The Beautiful Bureaucrat'

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 6:05 pm

In the realm of office work, there's nothing quite so soul-crushing as data entry, a job that combines the joy of carpal tunnel syndrome with the fun of being in a room that's either air-conditioned to Arctic levels or heated to a degree that is only technically survivable by humans. Add to that the anodyne preachiness of those ubiquitous motivational posters, and you've got, essentially, a fever dream of unpleasantness.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu August 13, 2015

A House That's Not A Home In 'Bright Lines'

Courtesy of Penguin Books

In the sweltering summer of 2003, studious and awkward Ella comes home from college and sneaks back into her own house. She's trying to avoid her adoptive parents — her uncle Anwar and aunt Hashi — and, maybe, to share the secret of her return with her outgoing cousin Charu, for whom she harbors a self-defeating infatuation. She's lived with them since she was a child, but coming back to the house is still a disconnect amid the familiarity.

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Fine Art
5:24 am
Thu August 13, 2015

The Anxious Art Of Japanese Painter (And 'Enemy Alien') Yasuo Kuniyoshi

Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, seen here in his New York studio in 1940, exhibited with Georgia O'Keeffe and Edward Hopper. But his work was quickly forgotten after his death in 1953.
Alfredo Valente Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 6:30 pm

In 1906, 16-year-old Yasuo Kuniyoshi came to the U.S. alone from Japan. He made his name as a painter and at 40 he was showing his work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. But there was one thing Kuniyoshi longed for that he was always denied: American citizenship. In fact, he was classified as an "enemy alien" during World War II.

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Pop Culture
5:24 am
Thu August 13, 2015

A Comedian And An Angry Kid Find An Unexpected Connection On Twitter

Comedian Chris Gethard's show brings a wild, unplanned public-access sensibility to mainstream cable television. But that spontaneity can attract trolls.
Zac X. Wolf

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 3:08 pm

When you're out there on the Internet, sometimes it's worth remembering there's a person on the other side of the screen; it could lead to an unexpected connection.

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The Salt
12:45 pm
Wed August 12, 2015

Dining Like Darwin: When Scientists Swallow Their Subjects

Scientists who eat the plants and animals they study are following in the tradition of Charles Darwin. During the voyage of The Beagle, he ate puma ("remarkably like veal in taste"), iguanas, giant tortoises, armadillos. He even accidentally ate part of a bird called a lesser rhea, after spending months trying to catch it so that he could describe the species.
Benjamin Arthur for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 14, 2015 10:40 am

Scientists are a driven bunch, dedicated and passionate about understanding the inner workings of the world. You must be focused, willing to work strange hours in every kind of weather. Willing to go beyond the known and be constantly inspired by your curiosity.

It takes guts to be a scientist. And a strong stomach doesn't hurt, either.

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Book Reviews
10:03 am
Wed August 12, 2015

Queen Of The Desert Gertrude Bell, In Her Own Words

Courtesy of Penguin Classics

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 10:23 am

"I cannot feel exiled here; it is a second native country."

Every biography carries dual burdens. One is to represent the life of the subject in the time they lived — how they operated within their own system — as honestly as possible. (That last bit's a real stinger; it's one of the reasons you should never trust a biopic of anyone who's still alive.) The other duty, which often comes in retrospect, is as a point of reference in its subject's legacy, which might be trickier still.

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The Salt
7:03 am
Wed August 12, 2015

Unfolding The History Of Napkin Art

In 16th century Italy, the nobility began decorating their tables with "triumphs" made entirely from folded napkins. The art form had pretty much died out by the time artist Joan Sallas began studying centuries-old illustrations and taught himself how to re-create them. Photo from The Beauty of the Fold: A Conversation With Joan Sallas.
Courtesy of Charlotte Birnbaum/Sternberg Press

Originally published on Thu August 13, 2015 12:57 pm

Napkins today are mundane and practical, made from paper or cheap factory cloth and folded, if at all, hastily into a rectangle. In the past, napkins weren't just for wiping hands or protecting clothing — they were works of art.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed August 12, 2015

Pizza As Autobiography In 'Slice Harvester'

Originally published on Wed August 12, 2015 7:09 pm

Pizza is a lot of things to a lot of people. Mostly, though, it's just food. Colin Atrophy Hagendorf is keenly aware of both sides of this not-quite-burning issue in his debut book, Slice Harvester. Subtitled "A Memoir in Pizza," it chronicles a two-year period in Hagendorf's life, from 2009 to 2011, when the 20-something burrito deliveryman wrote a blog called Slice Harvester, in which he reviewed a plain slice of pizza from every pizzeria in Manhattan. Hundreds of them.

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Book Reviews
2:23 pm
Tue August 11, 2015

Confronting Mortality In An Unsettling, Inspiring 'Tour Of Bones'

Skulls and bones are seen in the ossuary chapel in the Czech Republic town of Sedlec, one of the sites Denise Inge describes in her book, The Tour of Bones.
Michal Cizek AFP/Getty Images

Lots of us are afraid to confront the things lurking in our basements. In mine, it's the spider crickets; in Denise Inge's, it was the bones, piles of human bones that reached almost to the ceiling of the stone cellar beneath her house.

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