Arts

Three Books...
7:03 am
Mon December 24, 2012

The American Sublime: 3 Books On Faith In The U.S.

Bob Thomas iStockphoto.com

In light of the often tortured interweave of faith and politics in American life, we sometimes forget that our country was first settled by those seeking freedom not from religion but to practice their own versions of it: French Protestants and English Puritans. In many ways, religion is our founding fact. These books explore the vital undercurrent of faith in the expression of American life.

New In Paperback
7:03 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Dec. 24-30: A Spy, A Marshal, An Eavesdropper And A Guantanamo First

Fiction releases from Elmore Leonard, Ellen Ullman, Thomas Caplan and Alex Gilvarry.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
6:34 am
Mon December 24, 2012

Oscar-Winner Emma Thompson Revives 'Peter Rabbit'

After more than 80 years, Emma Thompson's The Further Tale of Peter Rabbit brings Beatrix Potter's beloved character back for a romp around the Scottish countryside — and lots of rule breaking. Thompson says Peter Rabbit's "disrespect for authority" is one of the things she loves about him. (This piece initially aired on October 11, 2012 on Morning Edition.)

NPR's Holiday Favorites
3:17 am
Mon December 24, 2012

David Sedaris Reads From His 'Santaland Diaries'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 6:30 am

You might not expect "Santa's Helper" to be a career-altering gig, but for David Sedaris, it changed everything. The writer and humorist spent a season working at Macy's as a department store elf. He described his short tenure as Crumpet the Elf in "The Santaland Diaries," an essay that he read on Morning Edition in 1992.

Instantly, a classic was born. Sedaris' reading has become an NPR holiday tradition. Click the "Listen" link above to hear Sedaris read his tale.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:02 pm
Sun December 23, 2012

The Movie Guy Raz Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Jack Black in Richard Linklater's School of Rock
Andrew Schwartz PARAMOUNT

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 1:43 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

On his last day hosting weekends on All Things Considered, Guy Raz tells us about the movie that he could watch a million times, Richard Linklater's School of Rock.

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Arts
7:51 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Get Your Tickets to WDIY's Winter Blast!

Tickets are on sale now for WDIY's Winter Blast, happening Saturday, February 2 from 7-11pm at the Rodale Room at Miller Symphony Hall in Allentown. 

The night will include light fare, beverages and lots of dancing to the music of Yancarlos Sanchez and Lehigh Valley Soul Project. We'll also have a photo stage, thanks to Dan's Camera, and a silent auction featuring photography, weekend get-a-ways, jewelry and more.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:55 am
Sun December 23, 2012

Unwrap 'Christmas' For Your Gift

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun December 23, 2012 12:41 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a word that can be formed from the letters of "Christmas." You'll be given two words as clues. The first one can precede the answer word, and the second one can follow it — in each case to complete a compound word or familiar two-word phrase. For example, given "forward" and "madness," the answer would be "march" (as in "forward march" and "March Madness").

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The Salt
5:11 pm
Sat December 22, 2012

The 'Bitter' Tale Of The Budweiser Family

August A. Busch (center) and his sons, Adolphus III (left) and August Jr., seal the first case of beer off the Anheuser-Busch bottling plant line in St. Louis on April 7, 1933, when the sale of low-alcohol beers and wines was once again legal. Prohibition didn't officially end until Dec. 5 of that year.
AP

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 9:05 am

For nearly 150 years the world-renowned beer manufacturer Anheuser-Busch was a family company. It was passed from father to son for five generations. A couple drops of Budweiser were put onto the tongue of each first-born son before he even tasted his mother's milk. That trademark brew, Budweiser, is known to the world as the "King of Beers," and the Busch family wasn't too far from American royalty.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:01 pm
Sat December 22, 2012

The Movie John Hawkes Has 'Seen A Million Times'

James Stewart, as George Bailey, hugs Karolyn Grimes, who plays his daughter Zuzu, in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life.
Hulton Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 22, 2012 7:28 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor John Hawkes, whose credits include Deadwood, Me And You And Everyone We Know, Winter's Bone and The Sessions, currently in theaters, the movie he could watch a million times is Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life.

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Recipes
5:39 am
Sat December 22, 2012

When Life Gives You Snow, Make Snow Cream

Snow cream, ice cream made from fresh snow, is a bit of a tradition in North Carolina, though snowfalls aren't common.
Courtesy of Chloe Tuttle

Originally published on Sat December 22, 2012 3:05 pm

There's snow across much of the country this weekend. In eastern North Carolina, where it doesn't snow a lot, snowflakes are an occasion for some folks to flock outside, scooping up what falls to make "snow cream."

That's ice cream made from fresh snow — but you have to mix it fast, before it melts.

Chloe Tuttle runs a bed and breakfast in Williamston, N.C., and she's a bit of an expert on snow cream. She tells Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon the trick is to use soft, freshly fallen snow.

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