Arts

Movie Reviews
6:08 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

'Stolen': What's Been Taken Is Mostly The Plot

Will (Nicolas Cage) is a former thief who must race to find his daughter before a onetime partner kills her in Stolen.
Millennium Entertainment

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 7:23 pm

Stolen is very different from Pierre Morel's 2008 exploitation megahit Taken: There are six letters in its title, not five. It's set in New Orleans, not Europe. And it stars Nicolas Cage, not Liam Neeson. So any resemblance between these two films about fathers who'll stop at nothing to get their kidnapped offspring back is purely coincidental.

Read more
Movie Reviews
5:55 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

'Liberal Arts': A Lesson In Arrested Development

Emotionally stunted Jesse (Josh Radnor) forms a relationship with Zibby (Elizabeth Olsen), a much younger woman, in Liberal Arts.
IFC Films

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 8:08 am

In his first big-screen sitcom, HappyThankYouMorePlease, writer-director-star Josh Radnor emulated Woody Allen. Radnor's second feature, Liberal Arts, is less Allenesque, except for one crucial, and vexing, aspect: It's about an older man's infatuation with a younger woman.

Read more
Movie Reviews
5:44 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

'Master' Actors Deliver Glimpse Into Cult Life

Navy veteran Freddie (Joaquin Phoenix) falls under the influence of cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in The Master.
Phil Bray The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 1:12 pm

Overheard after a screening of The Master:

"So I guess this is an unfinished print?"

"Nope. This is the one they're rolling out."

And it's true that there are moments, especially toward the end of its meandering 137 minutes, when The Master feels like a series of brainy but disconnected thoughts about 20th-century America. That's how writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson works, and for those who don't insist on coherence or closure in narrative any more than they do in life, it's part of the thrilling madness of his method.

Read more
Movie Reviews
5:30 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Gere Humanizes A Steely One-Percenter In 'Arbitrage'

Robert Miller (Richard Gere) struggles to hide his financial indiscretions from his daughter (Brit Marling) in Arbitrage.
Myles Aronowitz Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:55 pm

Anyone looking for a moral high ground — or any high ground at all — in Arbitrage will be sorely disappointed. And that's only one of the reasons that Nicholas Jarecki's family-and-finances drama, handsomely photographed by Yorick Le Saux, is so appealingly adult.

At a time when filmmakers might be under some pressure to punish the 1 Percent, Jarecki (who also wrote the script) chooses instead to remind us that making and keeping scads of cash is rarely accomplished by the fainthearted or the foolish.

Read more
Monkey See
5:22 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

When TV Shows Go To College, They Fail To Make The Grade

Many lead characters in Fox's Glee will head to college this season. But will higher education lead to lower ratings?
Fox

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:57 pm

I was packing up my recording equipment after interviewing TV executive Susanne Daniels — for a different story — when she said, casually, "Have you ever noticed how there's never been a really great TV show about college?"

I looked at her. Then I started unpacking my equipment again. She had just offered me a story.

Read more
The Salt
5:20 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

A Little Patience, A Lot Of Salt Are Keys To A Lost Pickle Recipe

There's more than one way to make a pickle.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:45 pm

Here's a new mantra you might consider adding to your list of daily kitchen chants: "It takes patience to perpetuate pickles."

Read more
Television
2:48 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

New Shows Hit Average In Fall TV Lineup

Mamie Gummer stars as the title character in Emily Owens, M.D., the best new show on broadcast television this fall.
Jack Rowand The CW

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 2:58 pm

Last year, the broadcast networks didn't do well at all when it came to new series development. We got ABC's clever Once Upon a Time, which was about it for the fall crop, until midseason perked things up with NBC's Smash. Otherwise, a year ago, all the exciting new fall series were on cable, thanks to Showtime's brilliant Homeland and FX's audacious American Horror Story.

Read more
Television
2:04 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

'Totally Biased' Comic On Race, Politics And Audience

W. Kamau Bell's new FX weekly series Totally Biased mixes standup, sketches and interviews.
Matthias Clamer

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 5:03 pm

Read more
Book Reviews
10:03 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Does The Success Of Women Mean 'The End Of Men'?

Double X blog. She is also a senior editor at The Atlantic." href="/post/does-success-women-mean-end-men" class="noexit lightbox">
Hanna Rosin is the co-founder of Slate's Double X blog. She is also a senior editor at The Atlantic.
Nina Subin Riverhead Books

Hanna Rosin's pop sociology work The End of Men, based on her cover story in The Atlantic magazine, is a frustrating blend of genuine insight and breezy, unconvincing anecdotalism. She begins with a much-discussed statistic: three-quarters of the 7.5 million jobs lost in our current recession were once held by men.

Read more
Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu September 13, 2012

'Lose Her' Finds Power In Resonant Voices

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:49 am

Great fiction is built around characters that follow the fruitless and wrongheaded paths they're offered, which is how readers savor safe passage into someone else's impetuosity. Yunior, who first appeared in Junot Diaz's debut collection, Drown, is the narrator in several of the stories in the Pulitzer Prize–winning author's third book, This Is How You Lose Her. Yunior is now middle-aged, middle-class, a self-described sucio struggling to mature into adulthood and not succeeding particularly well.

Read more

Pages