Arts

Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Undercurrents Of Unease In Kasischke's 'Stranger'

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 10:18 am

As writers churn out novels about zombies and the apocalypse — books that portray our shared anxieties about the early 21st century — Laura Kasischke's first collection of stories, If a Stranger Approaches You, describes a world haunted, not by the undead, but by the phantoms of unemployment, increased airport security and missed credit card payments. The signature confluence between realism and the uncanny found in much of Kasischke's writing, both as poet and novelist, makes this book an important addition to her own body of work and to the contemporary literature of end times.

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Books
7:03 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Beyond Visible: LGBT Characters In Graphic Novels

The Heart of Thomas, by Moto Hagio, was one of the first Japanese comics to deal with same-sex relationships.
Fantagraphics

OK, yes: To gay comics fans like me, DC Comics' decision to hire an anti-gay activist like Orson Scott Card to write Superman — an iconic character who exists to represent humanity's noblest ideals of justice and compassion — is deeply dispiriting.

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Monkey See
5:34 am
Wed February 20, 2013

From Louisiana To Versailles, Funding 'Vital Stories, Artfully Told'

Cinereach aims to support films that tell stories from underrepresented perspectives. The Oscar-nominated Beasts of the Southern Wild was one of those films.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 6:01 pm

The movie Beasts of the Southern Wild is a fairy tale of a film. It might not seem to have much in common with documentaries about evangelical Christians in Uganda or the billionaire Koch brothers. But these films were all funded by a not-for-profit group called Cinereach. It was started by a couple of film school graduates who are still in their 20s. And now, with Beasts, it has a nomination for Best Picture at this year's Oscars.

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Kitchen Window
1:56 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Be Prepared: Girl Scout Cookie Cooking May Surprise You

Doreen McCallister/NPR

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 2:44 pm

I'm not the first to develop recipes using Girl Scout cookies. About 20 years ago, I saw an article in a newspaper using Girl Scout cookies to make cakes. I made one of the recipes, and it came out almost as pretty as the paper's picture, and it tasted really good.

I was hooked. But before I could get started in the kitchen baking and cooking with Girl Scout cookies, I had a hurdle to get over. I had to decide whether I wanted to eat the cookies I ordered shortly after I received them — or delay gratification and experiment with them. It was a tough choice.

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Arts
1:59 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Douglas Ovens: Love Songs and Other Wonders - Part 2

Host Kenn Michael speaks with Douglas Ovens, Muhlenberg College, Music Department Chair about the Love Songs and Other Wonders concert celebrating his 60th Birthday and his composed works on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 at 8pm in the Empie Theatre of the Baker Center for the Arts on the Muhlenberg College campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

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Author Interviews
1:27 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Today's Bullied Teens Subject To 'Sticks And Stones' Online, Too

When Emily Bazelon was in eighth grade, her friends fired her. Now a senior editor for Slate, Bazelon writes in her new book, Sticks and Stones: "Two and a half decades later, I can say that wryly: it happened to plenty of people, and look at us now, right? We survived. But at the time, in that moment, it was impossible to have that kind of perspective."

In Sticks and Stones, Bazelon explores teen bullying, what it is and what it isn't, and how the rise of the Internet and social media make the experience more challenging.

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Arts
11:37 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Author Stephanie Powell Watts on Lehigh Valley Arts Salon

Bathsheba Monk welcomes short-story writer, Stephanie Powell Watts, whose collection of short stories, We Are Taking Only What We Need, is picking up every prize out there including being a finalist in the Pen/Hemingway first book contest and a Pushcart Prize.  Dr. Watts, who teaches at Lehigh, was named the “Best Emerging Writer” at the Southern Women Writers Conference and most recently was awarded the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence given annually to an African-American author for a book of fiction published the previous year.

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Arts
10:15 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Poet Lisa DeVuono on Take Charge of Your Life

Host Eleanor Bobrow talks with poet and workshop facilitator Lisa DeVuono.  She believes in writing toward wellness; the idea that writing can give us the creative power we need to find solutions to our problems. (Original air date February 18, 2013.)

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First Reads
7:03 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'Wave' By Sonali Deraniyagala

Sonali Deraniyagala was born and raised in Colombo, Sri Lanka. She now lives in New York and North London.
Ann Billingsley

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 8:28 am

  • Listen to the Excerpt

Economist Sonali Deraniyagala lost her husband, parents and two young sons in the terrifying Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. They had been vacationing on the southern coast of her home country Sri Lanka when the wave struck. Wave is her brutal but lyrically written account of the awful moment and the grief-crazed months after, as she learned to live with her almost unbearable losses — and allow herself to remember details of her previous life.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue February 19, 2013

A Bona Fide American Tragedy In 'The Terror Courts'

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 10:53 am

The torture of alleged terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay — first reported by the Red Cross in 2004 and since attested in thousands of declassified memos and acknowledged by a top official in the administration of George W. Bush — has never been far from the headlines, and rightly so. But another breach of human rights and American values at the Cuban prison camp gets far less attention: the secretive military commissions that prosecute these suspects away from the American justice system.

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