Arts

Monkey See
9:42 am
Thu February 21, 2013

'Argo' Is The Best Picture Frontrunner, But Why?

John Goodman, Alan Arkin and actor-director Ben Affleck in Argo.
Claire Folger AP

Programming Note: Sunday night, we'll be live-blogging the Academy Awards here at NPR.org, and the Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! team will be covering the red-carpet fashions, so be sure to join us to share your thoughts and see whether Affleck, Argo, and Daniel Day-Lewis have the big nights predicted for them.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Book News: Even Mark Twain Has A Shirtless Picture On The Internet

A photo of Mark Twain from the 1880s.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 6:50 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • Open Culture dug up an old picture of Mark Twain, who clearly did not heed his own (possibly apocryphal) advice: "Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society."
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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu February 21, 2013

The Satisfactions Of Simplicity In 'Jackal's Share'

iStockphoto.com

Chris Morgan Jones' latest espionage novel, The Jackal's Share, makes a reader appreciate the attractions of simplicity. There aren't any glitzy tricks here: no over-the-top villains or weapons arsenals; no le Carre-like meditations on the existential identity of the spy.

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All Tech Considered
5:14 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Amid Lawsuits, Aereo Brings Broadcast TV To The Internet

Aereo allows users to connect to a distant antenna — a tiny device that acts like an old set of rabbit ears — and watch broadcast TV channels on their computer, tablet or smartphone. Currently the service is available only in New York City, and it's embroiled in legal complications.
Source images from iStockphoto.com, composite by Camila Domonoske

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:52 am

An antenna or a provider: For nearly all Americans, those are the only two ways to access live network TV. Anyone within range of a transmitter can hook up rabbit ears to tune in to ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, and other broadcasters, while cable or satellite subscribers get local channels through their subscription.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
2:59 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Post-Sept. 11 World

Gen. Stanley McChrystal during a retirement ceremony in 2010. His comments in a Rolling Stone interview helped lead to his resignation.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 10:27 am

Tina Brown, editor of the Daily Beast and Newsweek, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for an occasional feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. She tells us what she's been reading and gives us recommendations.

This month, Brown sent three recommendations that all deal with the post-Sept. 11 world — stories of Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the military and political issues that shape the Middle East and the world at large.

A General Talks Back

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Hollywood Jobs
12:05 am
Thu February 21, 2013

For Film Set Decorators, Tiny Details Count

The third floor of the Warner Brothers Prop House holds a host of antiques available for rent by set decorators working on television and films. Each of the building's four floors is as big as a football field.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 3:07 pm

Picture Rick's smoky cafe in Casablanca, Lincoln's office at the White House of the 1860s, or the Mos Eisley cantina on the desert planet of Tatooine: A production designer came up with the overall look of those movie sets. But the booze on Rick's bar or the pens on Lincoln's desk — it took a set decorator and a crew to make them look authentic and believable.

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Monkey See
5:12 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Home Video Review: 'On The Waterfront'

As dockworker Terry Malloy in Elia Kazan's On the Waterfront, a young Marlon Brando firmly established himself as a leading Hollywood icon.
Criterion Collection

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:11 pm

Time again for a home-viewing recommendation from NPR movie critic Bob Mondello. Today, Bob suggests a tale of moral crisis — On the Waterfront, in a freshly restored Blu-ray version from Criterion.

Mugs and palookas, racketeers and dockworkers, mob boss Lee J. Cobb running the union with an iron fist, Marlon Brando tripping up its control when Eva Marie Saint urges him to go to the feds and rat out the rats.

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Book Reviews
4:20 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

'The Dinner' Offers Food For Thought

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:11 pm

Food doesn't matter much in novels. Years will pass in a person's life without a single description of a snack. Not a moment between adverbs for a taco. No wonder so many characters in contemporary fiction are glum: They're not hopeless; they're hungry.

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Ask Me Another
1:45 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Agrarian Maps

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our next two brave contestants. We have Deb Amlen and Jonathan Corbblah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jonathan, you teach chess, huh?

JONATHAN CORBBLAH: I do. I am a chess master and I've been teaching it in New York for the last ten years.

EISENBERG: Wow, a chess master.

CORBBLAH: Yes.

EISENBERG: I'm going to call you a chess king. Does that happen a lot?

CORBBLAH: Well, I'll take it.

EISENBERG: You'll take it, okay.

CORBBLAH: Sure, I like them all.

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Ask Me Another
1:45 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Misquoting Mark Twain

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

From NPR and WNYC, this is ASK ME ANOTHER, live from the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I'm your host, Ophira Eisenberg, and joining me later in the hour are our special musical guests Paul and Storm, and our puzzle guru Art Chung. Let's bring up our first two players. Please welcome Ursula Lawrence and Gregory Guity.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Welcome to you both.

URSULA LAWRENCE: Thank you.

GREGORY GUITY: Thank you.

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