Arts

Movie Reviews
11:53 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Historical, Fictional Icons Take To The Big Screen

Daniel Craig stars as the quintessential MI6 agent, James Bond, in Skyfall. The Bond franchise is 50 years old this year.
Francois Duhamel Sony Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:52 pm

Two icons, Abraham Lincoln and James Bond, make triumphant appearances this week in movies with more in common than you'd expect. True, Lincoln is a titan of history, liberator of slaves, and as such an adversary of Western colonialism, while 007 is an outlandish stereotype embodying white male Western authoritarian power. But the makers of these films do a sterling job of testing their respective subjects in front of our eyes — before pronouncing them fit to carry on in our collective imagination.

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Monkey See
11:23 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Arcades, Nose Putty, And Lisbeth Salander's Parents

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

As you may recall, last week's storm (big hugs to those of you still dealing with that mess) left us without a show, but we have returned this week with a fully stuffed episode in which we spend a little time on what we meant talk about last week: Cloud Atlas, which Stephen and I in particular did not want to have seen at almost 10:00 at night for nothing.

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The Salt
10:48 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Brothers' Original Fairy Tales Offer Up A Grimm Menu

Improbably, a girl finds strawberries in the snow to feed her stepmother in The Three Little Men in the Woods.
Arthur Rackham, Little Brother and Little Sister and other Tales by the Brothers Grimm

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 8:37 am

If you've only come across fairy tales courtesy of Walt Disney, or some other sweetened retelling, the dark culinary themes in the 19th-century versions told by the two German brothers, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, may come as a shock.

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Movie Interviews
3:16 am
Fri November 9, 2012

From The Theater To MI6: Sam Mendes On 'Skyfall'

Sam Mendes, best known for his Academy Award-nominated films American Beauty and Revolutionary Road, takes a turn with the action film Skyfall.
Stuart Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:46 pm

A new James Bond movie opens this week, 50 years after the first film, Dr. No.

The latest installment, Skyfall, finds Daniel Craig once again in 007's perfectly tailored suit. And this time, Bond is battling both the bad guys and his own mortality.

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Author Interviews
6:02 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Happens When Kids Fall 'Far From The Tree'

iStockphoto.com

As the old saying goes, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. In other words, the child takes after the parent; the son is a chip off the old block.

Of course, that's often not the case. Straight parents have gay children and vice versa; autistic children are born to parents who don't have autism; and transgender kids are born to parents who are perfectly comfortable with their gender.

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Monkey See
5:47 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Circus Roboticus, Or: This Actor Is A Serious Heavyweight

The cast and creative team of Sans Objet learned the hard way that a 2,800-pound robot can be a bit of a diva: Because he's run by a computer program, he never forgets his blocking.
Algae Bory

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 11:45 am

Whenever the military rolls out some revolutionary new robot, folks are quick with the Skynet jokes. But in recent years, some robotic-evolution experiments suggest that robotic rebellion might end in applause rather than annihilation.

Take, for example, the robot KUKA — the hulking star of a French nouveau-cirque performance, Sans Objet, which premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Friday. It's no special effect; it's a real robot, developed by the automotive industry in the 1970s.

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Movie Reviews
5:45 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Bond Is Back And Living Up To His Reputation

Daniel Craig returns for a third outing as James Bond in Skyfall, the 23rd installment in the spy movie franchise, and its 50th-anniversary release.
Francois Duhamel Sony Pictures

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:02 pm

Istanbul: Somebody's stolen a hard drive with info sensitive enough that ... oh, who cares? Bond is giving chase, and that's all that matters — cars careening through bazaars, motorcycles flying across rooftops until Daniel Craig's 007 lands atop a speeding train.

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Book Reviews
5:17 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Giving Wing To A Story Of Climate Change

Barbara Kingsolver's previous books include The Poisonwood Bible and The Lacuna.
David Wood

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:43 am

The mercury hit 100 for ten consecutive days in some places last summer, and the drought of 2012 may be a preview of what climate change will bring: amber waves of extremely short corn.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

'Lincoln': A Great Emancipator, But Not Quite A Saint

Daniel Day-Lewis takes on one of America's most famous presidents in Lincoln.
DreamWorks

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 11:54 am

This election season, pundits have been fond of pointing out the near-50/50 split of the electorate and talking about how the American people are as deeply divided as at any other time in our history. The opening moments of Lincoln put those hyperbolic claims in perspective, as Steven Spielberg — with his usual flair for highlighting how truly ugly war really is — shows a nation so divided that its opposing factions are killing one another in numbers so extreme that the bodies are literally piling up on top of one another.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Between Friends, Age Is Nothing But A Number

A part-time adult-film actress and a full-time burnout, Jane spends much of her time getting high with her friend Melissa (Stella Maeve).
Augusta Quirk Music Box Films

In two of her most prominent early roles — as Woody Allen's teenage girlfriend in Manhattan and as Dorothy Stratten, the slain Playboy centerfold in Bob Fosse's Star 80 — Mariel Hemingway played young women under the sway of older, more powerful men. Both characters are objects of beauty, and Hemingway's soft voice and hazy eyes reinforced their passivity, even as they hid a more introspective side. The overall effect is an innocent, almost childlike openness, like a blank slate ready for imprinting.

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