Arts

Arts & Life
12:01 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Tracing Latino Roots Via Sound

Eric Pearce Chavez

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 3:20 pm

Sonic Trace is a multimedia project that follows Latinos living in Los Angeles travelling back to their families' native lands. Led by radio producer Anyansi Diaz-Cortes, it examines the link between what some Latinos consider home – before and after they or their families came to the U.S.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Book News: Anger After Chicago School District Removes 'Persepolis'

coverdetail

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 11:20 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Theater
12:48 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Familiar Folks Make Up A Play's 'Good People'

Johanna Day as Margie and Andrew Long as Mike in the recent Arena Stage production of David Lindsay-Abaire's Good People. The childhood friends drift apart as their lives take on very different socioeconomic dimensions.
Margot Schulman Arena Stage

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 12:38 pm

How we end up in life has a lot to do with where we came from. That theory gets a good workout in the play Good People, from Pulitzer Prize-winner David Lindsay-Abaire. When the show was on Broadway two years ago, the trade magazine Variety proclaimed that "If Good People isn't a hit, there is no justice in the land."

As it turns out, justice has been served: Good People is the most produced play in America this theatrical season. By the end of this summer, it will have been on stage in 17 different cities.

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Author Interviews
3:59 pm
Sun March 17, 2013

Famine Ship Jeanie Johnston Sailed Through Grim Odds

Free Press

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 7:48 pm

Many of the 35 million Americans of Irish descent are here due to the worst famine to hit Europe in the 19th century, the Irish potato famine.

It drove more than a million people to flee mass starvation, many climbing aboard ships they hoped would ferry them to a better life in the New World. But the fate they would meet on what came to be known as "coffin ships" was often as grim or worse than the fate they were leaving behind; 100,000 passengers didn't survive the journey.

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Architecture
3:07 pm
Sun March 17, 2013

2013 Pritzker Winner Toyo Ito Finds Inspiration In Air, Wind And Water

Dome in Odate (multipurpose dome), Odate-shi, Akita, Japan
Mikio Kamaya Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 7:48 pm

Toyo Ito, a 71-year-old architect based in Japan, is the winner of the 2013 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The jury honored Ito for his more than four-decade career, in which he has created architecture that "projects an air of optimism, lightness and joy ... infused with both a sense of uniqueness and universality."

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You Must Read This
6:31 am
Sun March 17, 2013

'The Quick And The Dead': Parables Of Doom And Merry Rapture

cover detail

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 7:04 am

Domenica Ruta is the author of With or Without You.

I worked as a bookstore cashier for six weeks, until the day my manager rebuked me for reading. The store was empty and I was standing behind the register when she ripped a paperback out of my hands.

"You look like you have nothing to do."

"I was reading," I said, the only sensible response to such a ludicrous indictment. I was actually hoping a customer would come in so I could hold forth on the very book she'd pried away from me.

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Around the Nation
5:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Erin Go Bragh, Shalom: St. Patrick's Day The Jewish Way

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:33 pm

St. Patrick's Day in New York now means parades and green beer. But 50 years ago, it also meant green matzo balls at the annual banquet of the Loyal League of Yiddish Sons of Erin. The league was a fraternal organization of Irish-born Jews.

The major migration of Jews to Ireland started in the 1880s and '90s, says Hasia Diner, who teaches history and Judaic studies at New York University. Thousands moved, primarily from Lithuania.

Diner says the first generation of Irish Jews mostly worked as peddlers. But by the 20th century, peddlers became business owners.

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It's All Politics
5:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Documentaries Help Amplify Conservative Voice

Phelim McAleer directed the film FrackNation, one of more than 20 documentaries screened at this year's CPAC.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 2:11 pm

A decade ago, there were only one or two documentary films screening at CPAC, the annual meeting of conservative activists. This year, there were more than 20.

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Author Interviews
5:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Tsunami Delivers A Young Diarist's 'Tale' Of Bullying And Depression

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

A Tale for the Time Being presents the diary of a friendly, funny and strong-willed 16-year-old girl named Nao. Nao spent her formative years in California, but her family has returned to Japan, and when the book begins, she's living in Tokyo.

Nao tells readers right up front that her diary will be a log of her last few days on Earth: She plans to take her own life, and as the story goes on, readers learn why.

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Author Interviews
5:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Reminder: Our Memories Are Less Reliable Than We Think

Cover of Pieces of Light

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

What's your first memory? You're a baby or a toddler. Maybe it's a specific experience, maybe an impression. Maybe someone's face, or just a kind of feeling or sense. Or maybe it's a compilation of stories over years. And maybe it's less true than you think it is.

In his new book, Pieces of Light, Charles Fernyhough digs deep into the recesses of memory to figure out what shapes it, how it works and why some things stick with us forever. Fernyhough talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his own first memory and his exploration of the science of remembering.

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