Arts

Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

'Leviathan': Of Fish And Men, Without Chats

The dingy commercial fishing boats that dot the waters off the Atlantic coast of the U.S. and Canada have lives all their own in the new documentary Leviathan.
The Cinema Guild

Undersea things — iridescent creatures, mossy rocks, silky-slimy plants — are just weird. They're fascinating by their very nature, often barely resembling anything we have on land. Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Verena Paravel's half doc, half art project Leviathan capitalizes on that strangeness while linking it to the more prosaic world of commercial fishermen plying their trade off the coast of New Bedford, Mass.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
5:02 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

With Audubon's Help, Beat-Up Kid Is 'Okay For Now'

Courtesy The Audobon Society

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 6:30 pm

Fourteen-year-old Doug Swieteck seems to be stuck between a rock and a hard place. He has just moved to a new town, where he doesn't have any friends, and where his teachers — and the police — think of him as nothing more than a "skinny thug."

So it's easy to understand why Doug, the protagonist of our latest book for NPR's Backseat Book Club, Okay for Now, is anything but a happy-go-lucky kid.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
5:01 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

A Young Artist Finds Solace In Creatures Of The Sea And Sky

Courtesy James Prosek and Waqas Wajahat, New York

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 1:30 pm

In February, NPR's Backseat Book Club read a novel about a troubled kid who finds both strength and solace in the artwork of the renowned naturalist John James Audubon. The novel, Okay for Now by Gary D. Schmidt, takes place in 1968 in a little town in upstate New York where middle-schooler Doug Swietek is drowning in life's complications.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

A Quvenzhane by Any Other Name... (Storified)

Best Actress nominee Quvenzhané Wallis is interviewed on the red carpet at the Academy Awards Sunday, when several journalists struggled with the young actress's name.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

After a weekend that saw journalists on the Oscars red carpet struggling to pronounce the name of 9-year-old Best Actress nominee Quvenzhané Wallis, we decided to ask the Twitter masses for their funniest or most annoying stories about people mispronouncing their "unconventional" or "ethnic" names.

Here's a few of the best:

Do you have any similar stories? We'd love to hear them in the comments.

Arts & Life
2:05 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

The Case For Being Concise: Short Poems That Speak Volumes

In poetry, sometimes less is more.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 3:03 pm

Brad Leithauser likes to look for poetry in graveyards. A novelist and poet himself, there's something he values greatly in tombstone epitaphs: brevity.

"You really don't want to go on at great length," he tells NPR's Neal Conan. "There's something very touching ... in seeing how they are meant to be commemorated, often in little bits of verse here and there."

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Movie Interviews
1:13 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

'The Gatekeepers' Offer Candid Assessment Of Israel's Security

Director Dror Moreh was nominated for an Academy Award for his documentary The Gatekeepers.
Mika Moreh Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 1:30 pm

Six former heads of the Shin Bet — Israel's security agency — speak to director Dror Moreh in his Oscar-nominated documentary The Gatekeepers. They are men who have signed off on brutal interrogations and targeted killings. They have given their lives to the cause of Israeli security.

What is striking is that all articulate their shared conviction that the continued Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories will not lead to peace or a political solution for the future of the state of Israel.

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Ask Me Another
11:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Answer In The Form Of A Question

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Right now, we're about to get down to business with Nick Hudak and Curtis Dunn. They are our first two fabulous contestants.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Nick, you're a trivia guy.

NICK HUDAK: I generally like to think so.

EISENBERG: Do you watch any "Jeopardy?"

HUDAK: I do. My father actually was on "Jeopardy." He did very well until the very end, and then we lost. But we won a lovely refrigerator and a signed home edition.

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Ask Me Another
11:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Top Row

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER, NPR's hour of puzzles, word games, and trivia. I'm your host Ophira Eisenberg and this hour we're featuring some of the most mind-bending games we have ever played. In the studio with me is our puzzle editor Art Chung and our next number is called Top Row, which unfortunately has nothing to do with top shelf. It has everything to do with QWERTYUIOP.

ART CHUNG: I don't think QWERTYUIOP is a word.

EISENBERG: Check your computer.

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Ask Me Another
11:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

But Did You Read the Book?

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, what we've all been waiting for. Let's bring back the winners of our previous rounds to play our Ask Me One More final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From Answer in the Form of a Question: Nick Hudak. From Top Row: Lorna Jordan. From the Philosopher's Comedy Club: Stan Lee. From Call Me M.B.: Peter Hoffman. And from Buy a Vowel: Jessica O'Connell.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And I'm going to ask our puzzle guru John Chaneski to take us out. What do we got, John?

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Ask Me Another
11:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Buy A Vowel

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

All right, let's welcome our next two contestants: Billy Zayac and Jessica O'Connell. Welcome to ASK ME ANOTHER.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Billy Zayac, you have a degree in library science.

BILLY ZAYAC: Yes, I do.

EISENBERG: What is your dream library job?

ZAYAC: I would like to work in a special library doing something with cataloging, hopefully.

EISENBERG: That sounds reasonable. I like that.

(LAUGHTER)

ZAYAC: I'm very open.

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