Arts

All Tech Considered
2:51 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

A Bedding Innovation For People Who Hate Making Their Beds

Smart Bedding demo photo.
Courtesy of Smart Bedding

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:51 pm

In a blog series we're calling "Weekly Innovation," we'll explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Last week we featured the sink-urinal. (Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.)

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The Picture Show
2:00 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Cheers To That! A Photo Exhibit All About Drinking

Patron #1
Henry Horenstein Courtesy of Sasha Wolf Gallery

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 5:40 pm

It's exactly what it sounds like.

"I wish I could tell you there was some really profound reasoning," says curator Sasha Wolf, owner of the eponymous gallery.

But, as good ideas often do, this one came over a glass of bourbon, as Wolf was brainstorming summer show ideas.

Oftentimes in the quiet summer months, she explains, galleries will curate group shows on a seasonal topic — like flowers or beaches. But Wolf wanted to do something "a little bit more quirky."

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Arts
1:57 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

PA Blues Festival on Lehigh Valley Arts Salon

Celebrating 22 years of blues in the Poconos, host Maxx Foxx welcomes Michael Cloeren from Pennsylvania Blues Festival, happening July 26-29 at Blue Mountain Ski Resort, to talk about this year’s festival. (Original air date, July 15, 2013.)

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Music Reviews
1:51 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Sylvester: 'Mighty Real' Disco Star Deserves A Modern Spotlight

Sylvester's 1978 album Step II resulted in a couple of smash singles, "Dance (Disco Heat)" and "You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)."
Fantasy Archives

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:29 pm

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The Salt
12:45 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Local Sake: America's Craft Brewers Look East For Inspiration

Yoed Anis, president of the Texas Sake Company, says "the only constraint holding us back" from faster growth is the absence of a sufficient and consistent rice supply.
Courtesy Texas Sake Company

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:29 pm

Most of us are familiar with that hot, musky-smelling, cloudy drink served in teacups at sushi bars and sometimes called, erroneously, "rice wine." In other words, most of us have had bad sake.

But finally, Americans are learning to love the good stuff.

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Arts
12:19 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Storyteller Ed Stivender and the Lititz Storytelling Festival

Welcome to “Stories in the Valley.” I’m your host, Charles Kiernan

Today’s subject is Philadelphia’s own Ed Stivender: Shakespearean actor, banjo player, theologian, mummer, juggler, and raconteur. Ed Stivender has been called “the Robin Williams of storytelling” and “a Catholic Garrison Keillor.”

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Monkey See
11:13 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Morning Shots: In Which Kristin Wiig Gets Very Silly

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 12:37 pm

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Book News: Zimmerman Juror Drops Book Plans

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:40 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

For The Love Of The Game: How Cricket Transformed India

Cricket Game
iStockphoto.com

The English language and cricket were Britain's two largest colonial legacies in India, says journalist James Astill, but it is the second of these bequests that is the subject of his important and incisive new book, The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption, And the Turbulent Rise of Modern India. Astill is a former bureau chief for the Economist in New Delhi, and he notes the parallels between the country's control of cricket and its dramatic economic rise.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Last Words: An Author's Rhymed Farewell

David Rakoff was a radio essayist for public radio's This American Life.
Deirdre Dolan

What a loss. That's the thought that kept running through my head as I flagged one inspired rhyme after another in David Rakoff's risky (though hardly risqué) posthumous first novel. Why risky? For starters, Rakoff, who died of cancer last summer, at 47, chose to write this last book in verse — albeit an accessible, delightful iambic tetrameter that is more akin to Dr. Seuss than T.S. Eliot.

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