Arts

The Salt
2:31 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Liberte, Egalite, Gastronomie? France Rallies To Defend Its Food's Honor

A sampling of the multicourse menu served at the Gout de France dinner at the French embassy in Washington, D.C.: (clockwise from top left): seasonal vegetables with winter truffle Bayonne ham crisps; slowly cooked monkfish with fennel pollen flavors in "Armoricaine" sauce; Ariane apple and Guanaja chocolate onctueux; Saint-Nectaire cheese and grilled bread with nuts and raisins.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:18 pm

What do the French do when their economy and identity are under assault? Throw a dinner party, of course – a global one.

From Madagascar to Washington, D.C., more than 1,000 French chefs on five continents hosted multi-course gastronomic dinners last Thursday in celebration – and defense – of France's culinary prowess.

At one dinner, at the Chateau of Versailles west of Paris, around 600 guests (including NPR), dined in the lamp-lit Battles' Gallery, flanked by oil paintings of French military victories through the ages.

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Author Interviews
6:15 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

'13 Men,' No Clear Answers: Digging Into An Indian Gang Rape Case

In 13 Men journalist Sonia Faleiro chronicles the real-life case of "Baby" — a 20-year-old woman from the tribal village of Subalpur in West Bengal, India. Baby falls in love with a Muslim outsider and, she tells police, is gang-raped as punishment. Villagers maintain that Baby's story was fabricated.
Picasa Sonia Faleiro

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 1:26 pm

Last year, a 20-year-old woman left the Indian capital city of New Delhi and returned to the rural village where she grew up so she could take care of her sick mother.

The woman's name isn't public, but Sonia Faleiro — a journalist who's been investigating her case — calls her "Baby." She says Baby was known as a high-profile figure in her modest village.

"She became a somebody," Faleiro tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "A landowner. An employed young woman. She had money to spend. And she refused to accept that she needed to be like everyone else."

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Arts & Life
8:51 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Decades Before YouTube, Video Pioneers Captured Turbulent Era

From left, Videofreex David Cort, Bart Friedman and Parry Teasdale filmed kids' programs and daily goings-on in 1973 at their Maple Tree Farm in Lanesville, N.Y.
John Dominis Courtesy of Videofreex

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 12:02 pm

Back in the pre-digital era — when telephones were used for talking, not photographing and filming, and before YouTube came along to broadcast everyone's videos — capturing and disseminating moving images was expensive, time consuming and decidedly non-portable.

But that changed in 1967, when Sony introduced the world's first portable video tape recorder. Before long, enthusiasts formed "media collectives" that captured the social and cultural upheaval of the era. Fueled by a mix of the tunes, the tokes and the times, video became part of the revolution it was documenting.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun March 22, 2015

What's Last Comes First

NPR

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 9:19 am

On-air challenge: You'll be given some words. For each one, name another word that can follow the first to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase. The last and first letters, respectively, of the first word must be the first and second letters, respectively, of the second. For example, given "tennis," you would say "stadium" or "stroke."

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Author Interviews
8:02 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Author: Kids Need Abundant Connection With Nature

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 9:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Scott Sampson has a big fancy title. He's the vice president of research and collections at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. But to a whole lot of American kids, he's this guy...

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Theater
8:01 am
Sun March 22, 2015

William Electric Black Tackles Gun Violence In 5 Ambitious Plays

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 9:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
6:18 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Foraging In The Office Fridge: Petty Theft Or Public Service?

Snarky notes may not do much to ward off office fridge thieves. "I came across one guy who will intentionally steal people's food when they leave snarky notes," says Dan Pashman, host of the Sporkful.
Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 10:14 am

There is perhaps no greater opportunity to introduce tension into the workplace than within the walls of the office refrigerator. It's a social experiment without a set list of rules to guide behavior, and no authority to enforce what's appropriate.

Is a dollop of ketchup too much? What if someone's sandwich has been in there for days?

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Author Interviews
6:02 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

Thanks To Chance (And Craigslist), A Writer Becomes A Carpenter

131Pixfoto iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 3:22 pm

Nina MacLaughlin always knew she wanted to be a writer. She studied English and classics in college, and after graduation, she landed a great job with Boston's weekly alternative newspaper, the Boston Phoenix.

But after a few years of editing the newspaper's website, the drudgery began to hit her. It involved so much clicking, she says, and so many empty hours scrolling through the Internet. It didn't feel like how she wanted to spend her life.

And then came the low point: web producing a "listicle" of the world's "100 Unsexiest Men."

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My Big Break
5:35 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

'I'm Perd Hapley, And I Just Realized I'm Played By An Actual Newscaster'

Jay Jackson, as Perd Hapley, interviews Amy Poehler's character Leslie Knope during the sixth season of Parks and Recreation.
Colleen Hayes NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 7:41 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:17 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Not My Job: Richard Price (AKA Harry Brandt) Gets Quizzed On Pseudonyms

Lorraine Adams Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co.

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:43 am

Novelist Richard Price has spent his career writing about cops, but he didn't really get to know one until relatively late in life. "I had never met a cop before I was, like, 35," Price tells NPR's Peter Sagal. "I had no reason to. And I just got addicted to what you can see ... from the back of a police car."

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