Arts

Author Interviews
3:39 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Shipping: The 'Invisible Industry' That Clothes And Feeds You

Ninety percent of what we wear, eat and consume is carried by container ships like this one at the state-run Jaya Container Terminal of Sri Lanka's port of Colombo.
Lakruwan Wanniarachchi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:38 pm

Imagine a ship carrying goods in containers that, if lined up, would stretch around 11,000 miles long, or nearly halfway around the planet. Rose George spent several weeks aboard one such ship as research for her new book, Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car and Food on Your Plate.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
3:09 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

September Kids' Book Club Pick: 'Wonder'

Random House

When Madeleine L'Engle won the Newbery Prize for A Wrinkle in Time, she ended her speech with the thought that a book "can be a star, 'explosive material, capable of stirring up fresh life endlessly,' a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe."

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Monkey See
1:41 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

When A 'Total Eclipse' Leads To Some Serious Exposure

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Christina Bianco performs with some regularity at Jim Caruso's Cast Party and 54 Below's Backstage open-mic night in New York City. She's currently in the cast of Newsical the Musical, the current-events lampoon running at Theatre Row.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:40 pm

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Monkey See
11:08 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Why I Resist Web Redesigns (And Maybe You Do, Too)

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:07 pm

Words many of us never want to hear: "It's the transmission." "We can't get a technician out there until next Tuesday." "Your ex will be there."

And, of course: "Welcome to our redesigned site!"

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Book News: Handwriting Offers Clues In Shakespeare Debate

Shakespeare's handwriting may offer clues to a mysterious passage in Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'March' Sheds New Light On A Civil Rights Hero

Courtesy Top Shelf Productions

While the cynics among us might argue that America's high ideals and lofty rhetoric rarely transcend their inscriptions on stone, few would disagree that the 1963 March on Washington was one of the nation's finest hours. It was a transformational moment, and a portent for future blows to segregation and injustice.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
2:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Vintage Cadillac With The Memphis Soundtrack

American Safari tour guide Tad Pierson stands beside his 1955 pink Cadillac. Visitors to Memphis can get a personalized tour that highlights the city's rich music heritage.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

In the town where I grew up — Memphis, Tenn. — Tad Pierson has made a career out of his love for cars and American music by working as a tour guide. We meet in the grand lobby of the Peabody Hotel, the downtown landmark famous for its ducks and Southern elegance. But it's also considered the starting point of the Mississippi Delta, a region steeped in the blues.

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

In Maine, Lobster Comes Out Of Its Shell

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:44 pm

You might think a great benefit of living in Maine is unlimited access to fresh, cheap lobster. Most Mainers, however, probably eat less lobster in a year than tourists here consume in a week. Lobster bakes and boiling lobsters in those tall, speckled pots are grudgingly reserved for when company comes.

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The Salt
6:16 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

In Iraq, Laying Claim To The Kebab

Many different Middle Eastern cultures claim to have invented the kebab.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:54 pm

When you hear the word "kebab" in America, you might think of skewers with chunks of chicken or beef and vegetables, marinated and grilled on coals or gas. But say "kebab" in the Middle East, and it means a lot of things — chunks of lamb or liver on skewers, or the more popular version of grilled ground meat logs found in Turkey, Iran and much of the Arab world.

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Code Switch
5:48 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Kiese Laymon's Overdue Success Proves Publishers Can Change

Kiese Laymon is a contributing editor at Gawker and has written for NPR.org.
Courtesy of Kiese Laymon

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Writer Kiese Laymon has had the kind of year every first-time author dreams of: two books published to critical acclaim. But none of that came easily. The title of his most recent book, an essay collection released on Tuesday, hints at how tough the road really was: It's called How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America.

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