Arts

Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries
5:41 am
Sun September 1, 2013

With Modern Makeovers, America's Libraries Are Branching Out

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C., has opened a Digital Commons that features rows of desktop computers, portable electronic devices and even a 3D printer.
DC Public Library/The Freelon Group

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 3:58 pm

It's not exactly a building boom, but several public libraries around the country are getting makeovers. The Central Library in Austin, Texas just broke ground on a new building that promises such new features as outdoor reading porches and a cafe. In Madison, Wis., they're about to open a newly remodeled library that has, among other improvements, more natural light and a new auditorium. Historic libraries in Boston and New York City are looking at significant renovations.

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The Salt
4:58 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Discovering The Small Miracle Of The Soup Dumpling

A xiao long bao, or soup dumpling, in a large spoon.
Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:48 am

The first I ever heard of soup dumplings was 15 years ago in this New York Times story, which described xiao long bao as "the star of the show" at Joe's Shanghai in New York's Chinatown. It was a different era of New York food, when Szechuan peppercorns were still contraband, and the selection of Chinese restaurants was less diverse.

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Author Interviews
5:21 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

Shacochis Spans Generations In 'The Woman Who Lost Her Soul'

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 10:06 am

As a journalist and essayist, Bob Shacochis has covered conflict in the Balkans and Haiti, the abuse of American power overseas, spycraft, and the sexual politics that divide men and women. He is also a novelist and the winner of a National Book Award. His new novel, The Woman Who Lost Her Soul, was a long time coming, but critics are saying it was well worth the wait.

The Woman Who Lost Her Soul is a 700-page work that spans continents and generations. It's been compared to the work of Joseph Conrad, Graham Greene and Norman Mailer.

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Strange News
5:21 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

Welcome To 'Night Vale' — Watch Out For The Tarantulas

Welcome to Night Vale is the number one most downloaded podcast on iTunes.
Jeffrey Cranor & Joseph Fink

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 10:06 am

Jeffrey Cranor and Joseph Fink have the news of the weird covered: they're the creative masterminds behind the popular sci-fi podcast Welcome to Night Vale. Though only a year old, the spooky Night Vale — which channels David Lynch, Orson Welles and H.P. Lovecraft in its descriptions of a small, weird desert town — has rocketed up the iTunes ratings list to claim the number one most downloaded spot.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Sat August 31, 2013

The Rise And Fall Of Slackers

iStock

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 12:15 pm

As we pause this Labor Day weekend to celebrate the Great American Worker, we can't help but wonder: Whatever happened to the Great American Slacker?

It wasn't that long ago that slackers ruled the earth. OK, maybe ruled is a bit over the top because slackers, by definition, didn't really rule — or try very hard or take full responsibility. Whatever. But they sure were omnipresent there for a while.

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Recipes
7:57 am
Sat August 31, 2013

This Pork Loin Sandwich Starts With Happy Pigs

Matt Jennings' pork loin sandwich.
Catherine Welch NPR

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

It's the time of year when people are flocking to their farmer's market seeking out fresh fruits and vegetables for the summer picnic basket. But what about meat for the sandwich? One Rhode Island chef collects all of his ingredients at the farmer's market, including the meat, to make the perfect pork loin sandwich.

Providence chef Matt Jennings' sandwich gets its start down a gravel road, around an old, red barn where a couple of light pink pigs roll in the mud to keep themselves cool in the midday heat.

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Author Interviews
7:03 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Questions For Hugh Howey, Author Of 'WOOL'

Hugh Howey self-published the original WOOL novella in 2011. It has since grown to become a best-selling phenomenon.
Amber Lyda

After a varied career as a computer repairman and yacht captain, Hugh Howey turned his hand to writing. He'd self-published several novels and stories when the sci-fi dystopia WOOL, originally just a novella, found sudden runaway success in 2011. Howey found himself writing sequel after sequel to keep up with reader demand — the latest volume, Dust, was released in August.

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The Salt
5:06 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Don't Panic! Your Questions On (Not) Washing Raw Chickens

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 2:25 pm

Without meaning to, I seem to have sparked a "small #chickensh*tstorm," as food writer Michael Ruhlman put it, with my recent post about why you shouldn't wash your raw poultry. The strong, even vituperative responses to the post surprised me. I didn't anticipate that Americans would be quite so passionate about poultry hygiene.

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All Tech Considered
4:56 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Call Me, Haiti? One Man's Quest To Skype Around The World

YouTube

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:08 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Not My Job: Pianist Emanuel Ax Takes A Quiz On Axe Body Spray

Lisa Marie Mazzucco Emanuel Ax

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:56 am

This week we're recording at Tanglewood — the outdoor music venue in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts — and we thought it would be a good time to talk with classical pianist Emanuel Ax, who has won seven Grammy awards and recorded with the world's greatest orchestras.

We've invited Ax to play a game called "You make men irresistible to women!" Three questions about Axe body spray.

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